199 Comments

Comments

John LaVigne says ...
Dear John, In 1993 Rich DeVos wrote a book titled "Commpassionate Capitalism". In it he expresses many of the same thoughts and visions you have stated in your essay. I believe you have kicked it up a notch though. My concern is that we in MA are not fully benefitting from your vision. How can TL's cultivate your insight and vision to us who are on the "firing line" every day.
06/26/2007 6:35:11 PM CDT
Jon Roland says ...
This topic is embedded in a larger field which examines several things that provide a context and should be understood to make these issues clear. There is not enough space in this forum for a complete discussion, but I recommend the following: 1. Behavioral economics
06/29/2007 11:13:54 AM CDT
SR says ...
John, I had some skeptical concerns (which turn out to be unsupported) about WFMI and happened upon your website. I am a professional analytic philosopher, and let me tell you that while I don't share your libertarianism, I am very impressed by some of what you write here. Much of your argument for "Conscious Capitalism" is an adaptation and extension of Socrates' classic arguments against Thrasymachus in The Republic, Book I, and your replies to critics here who say that all that a corporation can be *really* interested in is profit follow the lines of the (very standard and convincing replies) to the claim that all people are *really* interested in is their own happiness/desires/interest. Excellent stuff! One worry I have about your Conscious Capitalism is that it clearly requires a sacrifice of short-term gain for long-term interest on the part of investors. For example, a Conscious corporation might grant the workers extra benefits, or make a change to a more environmentally sustainable production practice, with long term goodwill and positive feedback in view. Unlike WalMart, they will therefore run at quite high costs. The trouble with this is that the entire business/investment world is not thinking that way. Aren't your Conscious Capitalist businesses always going to be vulnerable to takeover from, for example, unscrupulous private equity firms who will sacrifice long-run goals for short-term cost reduction and a better-looking bottom line? Those sorts of takeovers can result in policy changes which are not transparent and can therefore generate the appearance of improving the company while doing no such thing. Nevertheless, the end result is that private equity firms or the like take the cash to the bank after a short-term selloff, while corporate consciousness has slipped out the back door.
06/29/2007 1:34:14 PM CDT
Tory Gattis says ...
Mr. Mackey, I recently shared some thoughts (below) on capitalism with Michael Strong and Jeff Klein of FLOW after Michael's recent FLOW newsletter on the moral purpose of capitalism. It's an excerpt from a white paper of mine exploring how the "next generation" of organizations might operate (or "Management 2.0", as Dr. Gary Hamel describes it). I hope you find it interesting, and, if you find any of it helpful, you're more than welcome to use any or all of it in your writings (as per your co-creation request). I'm very much looking forward to your June 12th FLOW event on Conscious Capitalism in Austin. HIghest regards, -Tory Gattis Founder, President, and Social Systems Architect OpenTeams LLC - Talent Unbound www.OpenTeams.com ------------------------------------------------ The Economy and Organizations People have needs. A common articulation of these broad needs would be Maslow’s hierarchy of needs in order of priority (see http://chiron.valdosta.edu/whuitt/col/regsys/maslow.html). People grow and mature up through Maslow’s hierarchy through repeating cycles of contentment -> discontentment -> aspiration -> achievement -> contentment, i.e. as they satisfy lower level needs they aspire to meet higher level ones. In a capitalist economy, people specialize their skills and then trade their services to meet these needs. Organizations act to coordinate large numbers of people and their skills toward creating a set of products and/or services for customers to meet their needs. Money can be thought of as “tokens of gratitude” that people give in exchange for having their needs met. Profit is a measure of value creation: input resources are transformed into output goods and services, and the difference (profit) represents the amount of value created (i.e. items with less total value to people have been transformed into items with more total value to people). High profits act as a signal to attract additional capital to grow to meet the market need, both to the organization itself and to its competitors. Competition keeps a lid on profits. Creativity/innovation enables the meeting of more needs with fewer resources, which can also be expressed as maximizing return on assets (RoA) or improving productivity. A more productive/efficient economy allows a broader portion of society to evolve faster through Maslow’s hierarchy. Since relatively fewer resources are required to meet a need, it becomes more affordable for more people. It also frees up society’s resources for meeting higher-level needs (i.e. fewer resources required for housing and transportation allows more resources for education, therapy, and meditation teachers). A new type of asset that has risen to prominence in recent years holds tremendous promise for vastly improving the productivity of our economy. Traditional assets, like land, physical equipment and employees’ time, have a one-time acquisition fixed cost, ongoing variable cost, and limited utilization (i.e. they can only be used for one function at a time). We might refer to these as “scarcity assets.” On the other hand, this new asset type still has a substantial one-time fixed cost, but little or no variable cost and unlimited utilization/duplication. Examples include intellectual property, databases, knowledgebases, software, medicines, brands, processes/methodologies, and educational and entertainment content. We might refer to these as “abundance assets” - once they have been developed and investors have received a return on their investment, their availability to society should be unlimited and their long-term price should move towards zero. Abundance assets have the potential to dramatically improve productivity, increase global wealth, and accelerate the evolution of society through Maslow’s hierarchy. So the net economic, social, and even moral purpose of organizations becomes clear: · help more and more of society evolve up Maslow’s needs hierarchy · by meeting customers’ needs · using fewer and fewer resources · through investing in abundance assets · to improve productivity. (aside: this works with Spiral Dynamics as well as Maslow, but I used Maslow since it seems to be more broadly known, understood, and accepted)
06/05/2008 3:17:28 PM CDT
Tory Gattis says ...
A version with the graphics can be found here: http://www.flowidealism.org/2007/Downloads/Conscious-Capitalism_JM.pdf
06/09/2008 3:30:13 PM CDT
chris macrae says ...
Working at coopers & lybrand in the early 1990s I began wondering what is the number 1 flow that corporations -and sustainability investors - wholly value. There may well be a dozen synonyms -over the last 20 years my 2 favourites have become goodwill or trust-flow. If we can agree on the list of synonyms, we can then search out a theory of probability that helps interested people, as well as hi-trust leaders, see which exponentials up or down a particular organisation system is compounding into the future. I am assuming that we agree that by definition: a system of productive and demanding relationships is spiralling sustainability exponentials up or down. Therefore so much of the quality of this has already been humanly invested in relationships system that the forward exponential currently being travelled is largely knowable if we audit the right stuff as far as flow is concerned. Mathematically we need to be prepared for metrics that tangible non-flow systems don't audit to inform the boardroom -let alone the organsiation-wide.
06/10/2008 8:22:47 AM CDT
Ed Freeman says ...
I just read this and its really terrific. I'm sure these comments are way too late, but I'll make them anyway. I would only add an example that sometimes helps. I need red blood cells to live, but it doesn't follow that the purpose of my life is to make red blood cells. Even after surgery, when I might need to focus explicitly on making red blood cells, it still doesn't follow that the purpose of my life is to make red blood cells. Likewise with profit. Businesses must have profits, but profits and purposes are just different things. Most great companies I know are oriented and managed around purpose. To the question of stakeholder conflict, I've come around to the idea that conflicts among stakeholders, conflicts among values, and conflict generated by critics are all opportunities to rethink the value creation model. You may have to make tradeoffs, but perhpas not...creativity and innovation often kick to dissolve the conflict, and create more value for each stakeholder.
08/28/2008 4:55:44 PM CDT
Sinan Gurman says ...
Dear John, I have been observing Whole Foods over a period of time and I would like to start with applauding you for the great company and vision you have created. I red the blog and my constructive feedback and ideas on improving the essay and the sustainability of conscious capitalism business model are below. In the “Voluntary Exchange” section, you are mentioning that voluntary exchange of information between all the main constituencies of an organization for mutual benefit is the ethical foundation of business (and capitalism). I agree with your definition and would like to point out a few important facts on how information technology and tougher economic conditions have been impacting these voluntary exchanges within the concept of conscious capitalism. Information technology has transformed and is continuing to transform the way most industries operate. The amount of information access we have is directly proportional to our bargaining power. When a shopper buys a product, her level of satisfaction with the price is relative. She may not be getting the best deal but she may be happy with her purchase if she did not know that the same product was at half price at a retailer down the street. She would be un-happy if she knew she paid more. Given the improvements in information technology, we have more access to the information we need and at the right time we need it. Therefore, the rules of the voluntary exchange are getting tougher. If price is the most important element in her decision tree, she will always figure out where it is the cheapest and buy it from there. For a business to be able to continue its operations, voluntary exchange between customers, employees, suppliers and investors should create incremental value for all as a result of these exchanges. The value conscious capitalism emphasize is NOT through large scale purchasing power and lowest prices. Conscious capitalism emphasizes the value created through efficient operations, service and selection. This is how Whole Foods defines value and its business model. However, the challenge during tough economic times is that the definition of “value” in consumers’ minds tends to shift due to changes in their ability to satisfy more basic needs. Consumers tend to become more price conscious. I support the Conscious Capitalistic Business Model; however, I find it difficult to sustain during rough economic times. I support it primarily because I can still afford to pay more for better service, selection and quality knowing that I directly or in-directly made a meaningful contribution to myself, the environment and the economy. Supporting environmentally friendly products and helping small businesses, which are the most significant elements of an economy are just few examples that Whole Foods provides through the conscious capitalism business model. Every time I shop at Whole Foods, I know I am in-directly impacting a good cause. On a separate note, one risk I see for conscious capitalism is a potential change in leadership during difficult economic times. I get the impression that you may also have the same concern John. There are multiple sections in which you are mentioning the potential change of the business purpose after the founding entrepreneurs retire or leave. I tried to provide my constructive feedback and my well-considered suggestions on how to improve the essay. I hope this voluntary exchange would be valuable. Moreover, I also have another suggestion to improve conscious capitalism business model. As I mentioned above, I see efficiency through the use of information technology and a differentiated customer service and selection as the most critical elements to support Whole Foods business model. When you have some time, I would like to tell you more about how I can help support this model through an innovative information service. I appreciate your attention to consider this voluntary exchange and I would be delighted if you can reach me directly at the e-mail address I provided. You can also get an introductory view at the web site I provided. Sinan Gurman
09/08/2008 6:11:59 PM CDT
James Smith says ...
The president of the interfaith clergy group stood and spoke for the group saying "The force be with you." It was his inspiration of the moment in 1999; it was the response to seven years of my paradigm shifting efforts toward supporting finding people's purpose, hope, and meaning which I had championed in that New York State community. The phrase was my farewell as I journeyed into the business world on my own self-commissioned mission to find how to engage in productive conflict which translates into meaningful lives for everyone. Nine years later, standing in the Crossings, having already chosen my path, I realized that the road is indeed integrated, life is whole, and the difference between business and meaning, purpose, and hope, is an arbitrary and potentially harmful distinction too often made. I knew from years of counseling and community leadership that business was falling far short of its potential in pursing simply profit, growth, and market leadership. Most of my friends in business disagreed. I was told, "You will be eaten up." I just disagreed and saw brighter horizons. Then I did as I always did; I followed them. It was this love and engagement with human potential and human experience that propelled me on this journey of discovery. It propelled me to a Jesuit College, Canisius, to learn business jargon and history while earning an MBA. This vision lifted me further to the campus of Cornell University in Ithaca where I focused on conflict in Industrial Labor Relations and became convinced that the concepts associated with empowerment, diversity, and conflict management were inadequate to apply fairly in the business system. But flashing back for a moment to standing in the Live Oak Auditorium at "The Crossings" in Austin Texas, surrounded by interfaith symbols, art and aesthetics exemplifying beauty, and with people who not only shared this holistic, connected vision, of business, of life, and of fun, I realized I had crossed back to a human home. That is the home in my heart, the home I knew, yet still wanted to build or be a part of building. The challenge to define purpose and pursue it more enthusiastically, with the emotional and mature support of like minded and hearted souls, was held up among us as a trophy or degree of accomplishment to envision and embrace. The "force", conveyed upon me at that interfaith meeting, has been, and now is, visibly, with me. That force is purpose. That force is human and universal. We are that force. I am happy The journey, like Michael Gelb points out in his biography on his "Mind Mapping" brochure, has some areas that are supposed to be educational but really teach us nothing. I have focused on the areas they teach but in significantly different ways which empower each person to pursue their own purposes. Michael Gelb made a clear observation about the usefulness of what is taught in much higher education, to which I would like to add, "The teachings in schools all over America are designed to support the "industrial system" of business and the society that it supports and, unfortunately, perpetuates. I have taken what I consider the very basic or essence of what people need to know to follow after their purpose and crafted a life time of experience and study and feeling into it. My purpose is to set the pent up productive power of people free to work in everyone, everywhere I can. How did I come to these conclusions, dimensions, and insights (if you find them insightful)? Part of the foundation of them is from my continuing pursuit of excellence in life long learning demonstrated by my inclusion in a PhD program on Human and Organizational Systems at Fielding Graduate University. I've earned my third Master's degree from there en-route to my PhD. Our entire society is based on dynamic interactions that tend to reinforce themselves in a way that seems "real" rather than "created" by leaders and followers who follow them. My goal has always been to make everyone a leader by supporting them to lead themselves with confidence, insight, and honor. I call my core ideas, "Executive Education for Everyone". Entrepreneurs, including educators and trainers, move this "dynamic interaction" in new and mostly healthy directions. I am both an educator and entrepreneur who proudly associates with Conscious Capitalism. It is the embodiment of both who I am and who I wish to become. It represents the world I wish to leave, through ideas and ideals, to my grandchildren and beyond. This event of gathering and starting the movement of Conscious Capitalism will best be benefited by momentum maintenance. Inertia is on our side. The present crisis is a challenge, but in Akido style we can turn the power of this crisis toward our own ends of inter dependence and a "business school of human relations", which we are. This effort requires all of us, a big "we", and a "super society" when compared with what we have been. It is time for the next level of social evolution that recognizes how developed human kind has become and how powerful we are yet to become as we head toward freedom, intuitive happiness, and even singularity of growth and purpose in living life. One clear distinction that allows for human evolution is the different type of system represented by conscious capitalism. Conscious Capitalism is an open system, always taking feedback from the wider system of human existance, including stakeholders and the environment. Capitalism, as it is now generally practiced is a closed system looking only on the internal factor of "profit" as feedback. Closed systems tend to implode without an external source of energy. The earth is a closed system except for the sun, which keeps it going. Capitalism needs to open up to the entire system of human life and living with positive expectation and embrace. Short term profits easily lead to defection and short sighted "cut and run" defection. Those in for the long run have more net present value than those with a "do what you must for profit" mentality. This distinction is crucial and form the basis for an improved business model. Our lives are long and depend on society to survive and thrive. Conscious Capitalism leverages this to a point of profit maximization through sustainability. Which would you rather have, an annuity (conscious capitalism), or deal to deal profit (capitalism)? With my deepest happiness and appreciation, James Smith Managing Member i4 Advantage, llc
11/16/2008 3:04:35 PM CST
Dean Bouch says ...
Hi John , Message from South Africa . I have never stepped inside a Whole Foods store, nor do I own stock. I'm a part time student at the Graduate School of Business in Cape Town, South Africa busy with an entrepreur assignment. This is my comment to you personally after reading your essay ; It appears your life task was not starting Whole Foods Market , nor redirecting an ethical means we ( humans )view and produce food, but possible pioneering a new direction in corporate and invester consicousness. You must have done something wrong to be this unlucky in this mission ........... ;-) While you, nor I , will probably live to see a 180 degree change in corporate capitalism, dont give up your quest to question, challenge and write what most people on this planet are grapping with. I dont have any suggestions on how to fix the worlds growing dissatisfaction with corporate greed, while we all apply double standards by asking for better returns on our savings. Goodluck , I hope you successed in setting a new moral standard which generations from now will look back at, and regard you as an ethical corporate pioneer who help make the Western world more balanced.
08/02/2009 7:35:45 AM CDT
Eddie says ...
God Bless You Mr. Mackey! You are a true Patriot, and I commend you for speaking the truth even if it goes against your liberal customer base. I think you need to run for office!
08/14/2009 4:25:54 PM CDT
Veronika Cerritos says ...
I enjoyed your article and the ideas that are provided. There are plenty of recommendations out there that are both savvy and bad. If you have any more ideas concerning natural health or simliar topics, that would be great. Keep up the good writing!
10/23/2010 4:43:14 PM CDT
chris macrae says ...
exciting to hear your simulcast today; I was wondering if you have an update on how closely your model flows with the social business and future capitalism partnering that revolves round muhammad yunus who was recently voted genius economist by us congress for his win-win-win models; I realise wholeplanetfoundation emerged with some early inputs from Grameen Trust but these days Grameen has more explicit brand partners in win-win-win capitalism such as Grameen Intel and Grameen Danone - why no Grameen Whole Foods?
10/25/2010 3:54:38 PM CDT
Chuck Blakeman says ...
Mr. Mackey, Great manifesto - thanks. The chart from Firms of Endearment not surprisingly shows 30 companies making bigger profits because they had a "Big Why" that was bigger than just making money. There have been conscious companies doing that long before "social" "conscious" or "creative" were stuck in front of "capitalist". And they prove what I say all the time - Making money is not an empowering vision. However, I'm not sure we get the traditional capitalist on board by telling them they shouldn't focus on investor return. Wouldn't it simply be better to tell them (which you do later in your article), that they will make a lot more of it by not focusing on it? Maybe we don't need to convert them (at least not at first). Maybe we simply need to appeal to their existing world view and help them see how conscious capitalism is a better path to their own objective - making money. Celebrate it with them. In my new book "Making Money is Killing Your Business" )www.makingmoneyiskillingyourbusiness.com), I don't expend energy on converting to truth, beauty and goodness although I think these three have made the world go round since the dawn of man. I simply ask early stage business owners to grasp the idea that people who focus on something bigger than making money always make more of it. (Almost) everyone goes into business thinking they did so because they needed or wanted to make money. Although I believe no one actually has that motivation, I'm going to meet them where they are at, not where I want them to be, and first solve the issue they think they have (making money). If I help them solve their felt need, from there I have their ear and can say anything I want and they will listen. So I love that you demonstrate clearly that there is a better way to make money than focusing on making money. I would encourage you to lead with it and keep focusing on how much more money an investor-focused capitalist can make if they aren't focused on making money. Their hearts will come around in the process. Let's meet them at their point of felt need, since it's really so easy to do. Thanks for your leadership in the process.
01/20/2010 4:00:45 PM CST
Marshall Engelmeyer says ...
Hmm:D I read blogs on a similar topic, but i never visited your blog. I added it to favorites and i will be your constant reader.
02/02/2010 3:08:59 AM CST
yam says ...
Thank you for your article/post and thank you for your information you gave me. I Love your blog very match.
12/04/2010 12:06:22 PM CST
Tammy Allen says ...
When I was creating the business model for Do Good Get Rewards, a volunteer rewards program 2 years ago, I found out about Conscious Capitalism on the web. I began using the term and even included it in our business model description. I had the pleasure of joining a conference call where you defined what the differences are between a typical for profit business is and a business that has at the core of it a mission of doing good and making an impact. Even before I knew of the term or the philosophy that is what I wanted to create with Do Good Get Rewards. Creating the web site the unique program and then bringing our company to life has been the most thrilling adventure of my life. I get to see first hand how much good is going on the world. So many great Non Profit programs large and small that really make a difference in peoples lives. There are huge numbers of people volunteering. Over 63.8 million people volunteered last year according to the National Service. We have over 100 Non Profits signed up from the Metro Atlanta area after only one year. None of them report to National Service,including Girl Scouts, American Cancer Society and many more. The numbers of volunteers must be 2 or 3 times that. Our countries heart would have to be softened to hear that. Thank you John for being so passionate about spreading the message that businesses can do good and create a profit at the same time. I can tell you from personal experience creating Do Good Get Rewards is the most fulfilling, rewarding for me I have ever done and I am no spring chicken. Keep up the good work and if you ever want to have an event in Atlanta to spread the word about Conscious Capitalism, I would love to help organize it. Warm Regards, Tammy Allen Founder Do Good Get Rewards
11/19/2010 12:05:40 PM CST
Shonna Penfield says ...
You made a number of fine points there. I did a search on the matter and found most people will go along with with your blog.
12/15/2010 2:53:13 PM CST
Daniel Latch says ...
Welcome to my world. Thank you for coming into my scope of awareness as a like minded soul. In response to your statement above: " Requests for additional benefits are endless. But this is also true for every stakeholder—the desire for a better deal. Every stakeholder is always looking for more. Customers are always looking for lower prices and higher quality. Investors want higher profits. Team members want higher pay and additional benefits. The government wants higher taxes, and the community wants larger donations. " I envision charities as an underlying infrastructure emerging to new prominence on the power of new resources. With the direct support of the economy aided by my technology it is possible to deliver 1% and more of the U.S. retail economy to the charities people wish to support at the local, national and international level. With proper support, we can create a new norm that will spread like a virus around the world. I see local and regional networks rapidly developing from centralized competitive nodes of social goodwill issuing cards and since the only change in behavior is to use another swipe a card, one that shows you care every time you use it. I'm after sending just 1% to charity as a portion of our national retail spend. I am very curious to know your assessment of this virtuous triangle concept of connecting consumer, merchant and charity. Merchants control the rebate down to 1% and consumers choose to shop participating merchants. This system is in operation and I am happy to share more at your request.
01/26/2011 12:55:42 PM CST
Bill Spiropoulos says ...
Dear John, Greetings from New Jersey, where I am a proud team member of 2 1/2 years at the Millburn/Union store. I ran across your article on Conscious Capitalism and find it very inspiring. As a lifelong working-class lefty, I admit it is still hard for me to trust the conformist, money-hungry corporate world in general, but I appreciate that you've articulated an alternative paradigm for business and have successfully put it into practice with WFM. I most especially appreciate that WFM's "green-ness" and commitment to improving the environment and combating poverty doesn't seem to be a cynical PR ploy or bandwagon-hopping, but a sincere value that somehow--somehow!--isn't at odds with WFM's status as a for-profit corporation. I spent seven years at a large public-service non-profit which helped forge my opinions about the relative merits vis a vis for-profits, but my time at WFM (and your very intelligent writings) has helped steer me in a different direction. I should point out that I do have ambitions to someday start my own business--probably something related to my first loves, music and/or the arts--and I expect I will take some of what you've taught me to heart when I do. Thanks for everything! :-) cheers, Billy S.
04/09/2011 12:47:17 PM CDT
Susan lanesey says ...
Thank you for this great post and great blog. You have shared incredible ideas here and as a student and customer, I appreciate the ideas you share.
04/15/2011 7:25:10 PM CDT
juan yi says ...
John, Food for thought (see what I did there?), no, seriously, there is a lot of clear thinking out there, and this is some of the best, I started a business 6 years ago, inspired by the Slow Food Manifesto, and also by the Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid, living in a "3rd world country"... I really believe that there is still more to it, in terms of crating the new inclusive business models, but I am also certain that this discussion is the right path to get there. Thanks for sharing. Juan
09/29/2012 2:41:34 PM CDT
Nicholas Foran says ...
The Value of Educating Stakeholders to See Value??? Thanks for these encouraging thoughts. I am a young entrepreneur on a team that is trying to take on the employee health and engagement crisis. Stakeholder value is now at the front of my mind and some questions have come up... Our product is in an industry that has always been a little sideways (similar to the grocery business back when you started I assume). People's health should not be tied to money and untruthful influence but this seems all to often the case. We have found that part of the value we provide is educating stakeholders to see value where they once did not. Sometimes this goes well and other times it is a very hard and long road. It seems to me that this is an obstacle you were up against as well when you started whole foods. How did you navigate educating the client or employees or the community when they did not seem to understand? Do you believe this is a part of the value entrepreneurs provide to the stakeholders? Do you address the company purpose of "Heroic" any where else? Is there any literature available on whole food's approach to an organization's emotional intelligence? I gathered a little bit from the Quality Standards and the Multi-Stakeholder Process blog post but was wondering if there was more. I've included a short description of our business for a point of reference. Ironically, your approach to capitalism (love the adjective "conscious" by the way) is very much needed in our corporations to have the health challenges confronted. Our organization believes technology coming alongside the power of social networks will rescue the health and well-being of today's employees. Healthy activities will become socially contagious and create a wholesome corporate culture. Paradoxically, we see a health and wellness industry that is full of novelty and quick fixes but lacks sustainable cultures of health. We aim to be stakeholder-centered but find they are highly influenced by these forces. There are good guys our there Dr Kenneth Cooper, Dr James Fowler (one of our team members and author of the book Connected), but all of us seem to be scrambling to understand how to interact with businesses to create lasting change. PS I love the flowproject/radical entrepreneurs website. I just got back from a new peace making initiative in the middle east that aims to use technology and social networks to better communicate the human narratives of both Israelis and Palestinians. Thanks, -- Nicholas Foran
10/03/2012 2:49:49 PM CDT
Bob says ...
I am doing a project on Whole Foods Market and was wondering if you can tell me what you think are Whole Foods Market Core Competencies? Would you say its about giving back to the community, or being green conscience or having the Whole Trade program.
11/01/2012 11:55:46 AM CDT

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