4,666 Comments

Comments

FLORIDA MOM says ...
<p>I initially shopped at the Whole Foods here in Tampa when it first opened and quit doing that about a year ago. After this article I am going this weekend! Kudos to you what a great American Patriot you are! There are many just like you down here in Florida. Behind you all way!</p>
08/14/2009 5:21:00 PM CDT
Bryan says ...
<p><strong>Off topic. </strong> Care to discuss why you oppose unions so much, Mr. Mackey? Or how many of the commenters on this blog post are sockpuppets, given your past history of such on yahoo! business discussion boards? Or how you can allow employees to vote on health care choices without being in violation of NLRB guidelines?</p>
08/14/2009 5:22:00 PM CDT
lj says ...
<p>Too little, too late. Even if this explanation ('WSJ edited me') satisfied me, I have since discovered other things about you, your politics and your business ethics that I dislike. Your company will have to do without the $175 we've been spending weekly at your stores for the past several years.</p>
08/14/2009 5:23:00 PM CDT
Interesting says ...
<p>I hope you do read this, cause you argument against healthcare being a right is extremely weak. Especially when you compare it to food and shelter not being rights.</p> <p>So what are inalienable rights? Among them, the right to bear arms. Should carrying weapons be more of a right than being given healthcare? I mean, if you aren't healthy food and shelter aren't really going to help. How can one work if they are sick or severely debilitated. By your logic, you would not have the right to protect yourself if you are sick.</p> <p>While I agree that people should be proactive and a number of your other points, I think you are being not willing to look outside of the box. Just because Canada and many places in europe have fully functioning healthcare systems with 'long lines' that 'equate to rationing' (have you been to some of your stores sir? are you rationing the amount of people to go in or it it just because you provide a good service that people line up?) doesn't mean that the system we choose has to function like that.</p> <p>Also, your example of what Whole Foods does, does not constitute what other people should do, as your organization is not fully representative of the types of business that exist out there (remember, more people are employed in small businesses, not large ones).</p> <p>Good Luck.</p>
08/14/2009 5:24:00 PM CDT
boadicea says ...
<p>BTW, a friend refuted your points pretty thoroughly <a href="http://web.archive.org/web/20101020182743/http://www.texaskaos.com/diary/6089/refuting-the-whole-foods-alternative-to-obamacare" rel="nofollow">here</a>.</p> <p>Just in case you are interested in possibly learning instead of just promoting debunked talking points.</p>
08/14/2009 5:25:00 PM CDT
B says ...
<p>I applaud you for making your opinion known. There are many who have not read this bill, that is over 1,000 pages, and includes provisions in it that would make our Founding Fathers roll over in their graves. This bill is on target to push the US into a socialized country and most of it's supporters have not truly read it. I don't understand why the hippies who have mainly supported Whole Foods and fought for individual freedoms in the 60's, now support stripping our freedoms away. You may have lost a lot of consumers, but my guess is that people like me will get behind you and shop there more. Thank you for your common sense!</p>
08/14/2009 5:25:00 PM CDT
Allison says ...
<p>Thank you for your recent piece in the WSJ. It was thoughtful and you raised some straightforward and inexpensive alternatives to enacting yet another costly government healthcare program. It is unfortunate that so few of our elected officials are listening. Please continue to speak out on issues when you have something valuable to add to the debate, despite the negative comments from some 'progressive' and 'open minded' customers. I have been customer of Whole Foods for years and will continue to support your business.</p>
08/14/2009 5:27:00 PM CDT
Frank says ...
<p>Bravo! I wish the senators were talking this straight. Love whole foods.</p>
08/14/2009 5:28:00 PM CDT
Chuck Lin says ...
<p>I find it unfortunate that so many people believe only liberals shop at Whole Foods. And the people who decided that because they don't agree with John Mackey's opinion, they can no longer shop there.</p> <p>It just shows that some people who claim to be open minded have the narrowest of views.</p>
08/14/2009 5:30:00 PM CDT
John says ...
<p>Thank you, Mr. Mackey. I am a closet conservative shopper at Denver Whole Foods (Hampden Avenue). I suspect most of the wonderful WF employees who regularly help me select organic produce and fresh fish would share exactly NONE of my public policy or political views, including my (our) views on health care reform. I cannot tell you how many times prior to the election my checker asked if I had voted yet '¦ presumably for McCain (NOT!). But, you know what? I take no offense. They are all great people. (They can't even make me feel guilty for keeping my 30 cents for bringing my own bags!) In the years I have shopped there, it never occurred to me to boycott your store because most of your employees are lefties (although I did park my car with the McCain sticker at the end of the lot to avoid any 'errant' carts of other shoppers). Rather, I shop at your store because eating good food keeps me and my family healthy. Sort of our own family's commitment to health reform. So, it is with disappointment, irony, and even amusement that I read that some on the left are boycotting WF stores because of your common sense view on health care reform '¦ even though the bill offers nothing to our fellow citizens that has anything to do with good health '¦ as you and I would define the term. Hang in there, sir. You know you are right. American knows you are right. And, when the politics settle, even your not-so-committed shoppers will know you are right, too.</p>
08/14/2009 5:31:00 PM CDT
Bryce Doty says ...
<p>Echoing other comments, thank you for your op-ed. I did not interpret your essay as hateful. I can understand how others interpreted it as that though. Thank you for adding constructively to the health care reform debate. I hope that some of your ideas make it into legislation.</p>
08/14/2009 5:34:00 PM CDT
Sarah says ...
<p>You are out of touch with this country! Ever been to a neighborhood where there's not a WF? Or maybe you'd be willing to open some new stores in areas where people don't have access to your health-conscious products? South Central LA? Fifth Ward Houston? If that's what you think is the right answer, put your money where your mouth is.</p>
08/14/2009 5:35:00 PM CDT
Marcelo Teson says ...
<p>That Thatcher quote is absurd. The last 8 years have shown that unregulated capitalism does a marvelous job of running out of other people's money. Their pension money, the money invested into their homes, and now their tax money. I'd also add that the person you quoted presided over a country with a massive socialized medicine apparatus and left it that way. Just today the head of Thatcher's conservative party reiterated their staunch support for socialized medicine.</p> <p>And if you TRULY favored individual choice and responsibility, you ought to let your workers unionize if they choose to instead of busting up their attempts to do so (like you did in Madison, WI). I guess in your mind people should be free to do anything they want'¦except organize.</p>
08/14/2009 5:37:00 PM CDT
Mary says ...
<p>Just sold all of my WFMI stock.<br> Will NEVER EVER shop at Whole Foods again.<br> As CEO you cannot separate your personal and mean-spirited opinions from your fiduciary duties to the company. Perhaps you are simply targeting a new market segment which you have every right to do. But I no longer part of your target market.</p>
08/14/2009 5:39:00 PM CDT
Cate says ...
<p>Thank you Mr. Mackey for taking the time to voice alternative solutions to socialized medicine. They sound much better to me than what is currently being proposed. The angry people who have commented don't understand the actual situation we're all in as health care and health insurance goes these days. On the other hand, you seem to have a sound mind and actually care for your employees, which I greatly appreciate. Will a store ever be opened in the Boise area??</p>
08/14/2009 5:39:00 PM CDT
TheDuneman says ...
<p>Great view. It is of no wonder to me that Whole Foods is as successful as it is with this kind of mind at the helm. Much respect, i would love to shake your hand.</p>
08/14/2009 5:40:00 PM CDT
Jen Staffeldt says ...
<p>Mr. Mackey,<br> I applaud you for stating your OPINION. Anyone saying that you are a fool or unAmerican because you are stating your thoughts are the FOOLS. </p> <p>YOU ARE NOT ALONE Mr. Mackey and the points you laid out are a great examples of common sense to improve our current health care options. </p> <p>I hope that you are reading these comments and know we support you and you are not alone ' as well as how much I LOVE Whole Foods and your companies values.</p> <p>Jen Staffeldt Smith</p>
08/14/2009 5:41:00 PM CDT
john says ...
<p>don't be fooled by the many positive responses here by desperate conservatives. your customer base is largely liberal democratic, and this will hurt whole foods.</p>
08/14/2009 5:43:00 PM CDT
Jim Dullanty says ...
<p>I join others who found your comments clear and refreshing. We are facing a national crisis in health care and other entitlements and they need thoughtful moderate dialogue, something we seem to have lost in these times.<br> One of your admirers suggested you run for office. I would not wish that on my worst enemy, but I would ask that you take this message out to the American people in an even broader forum than you have this week.<br> Good luck!</p>
08/14/2009 5:43:00 PM CDT
Zach says ...
<p>Good on you man. If you are ever in Canada send me an email, I'll treat you to some fine ol' Canadian healthy cookin'.</p>
08/14/2009 5:44:00 PM CDT
naomi says ...
<p>Unfortunately, we do not live in an ideal world. Healthy people, who live healthy lives, get hit by cars, still get cancer, inherit health problems, and lose jobs. Whole Foods may hire anyone who is qualified, regardless of pre-existing conditions, but few other companies do the same, even those larger. The U.S. is losing its standing in the world, in large part due to the healthcare costs which companies must spend while other countries in the developed world cover these, freeing up money for the corporations and small companies to put back into building business. Whole Foods may be an ideal employer; unfortunately, too many companies and corporation either cannot or will not offer the same benefits as this company does. Perhaps it is time to look outside your privileged life and check out that of the majority of the citizens of this country.</p>
08/14/2009 5:44:00 PM CDT
Bryan says ...
<p>Even in countries such as Canada and the U.K., there is no intrinsic right to health care.</p></blockquote> <p>How can you lie like this with a straight face? UK and Canadian citizens receive basic care cradle to grave. Perhaps you'd care to ask their politicians about that. </p> <p>Have you no sense of decency, sir?</p>
08/14/2009 5:45:00 PM CDT
evie says ...
<p>Health care is, most certainly, a basic human right. Anyone who does not believe so is beneath contempt.</p> <p>Health insurance companies need more regulation, not less. (Ever hear of pre-existing conditions? Rescission?) People don't rush to the doctor at every stubbed toe. Even most people who have insurance fail to remember to have regular checkups. If they are sick, they are sick and your $2,500 deductible is a disgrace. You are afraid of standards ' the same type of standards the meat industry, the dairy industry and the food industry in general has to undergo ' for health insurance coverage. Allowing unlimited deductibles is a stunning 'idea.' And tort reform? Really, turn off Fox News. Can't you come up with a more original talking point?</p> <p>We have spent thousands and thousands of dollars at Whole Foods every year since 1992, when we first moved to the Bay area, including after we re-located to Chicago. You will not see another dime from us unless you retract the op-ed or resign. </p> <p>You are certainly entitled to your opinion and if you'd kept it out of the major national papers, I would still be buying from your store. But you used a very public platform to KILL HEALTH CARE REFORM, a vital issue to the progressives who frequent your store. That's where I draw the line. I'm not giving money to a company that allows their CEO to publicly try to kill health reform.</p> <p>And you're a big boy. A savvy one, as well. It's your article. You should have signed off on the headline. In fact, you probably did.</p> <p>I wish you luck that all those who align with you ' who, let's face it, do not currently shop at your stores ' make good on their promises to do so. They should be aware, though, that the tea will cost a bit more than they are used to.</p>
08/14/2009 5:45:00 PM CDT
Scott Hirsch says ...
<p>Your analysis does not factor in the societal cost of having sick citizens, employees, and customers, and you assume that basic health care has to be priced based on existing wasteful models and extravagent. Take an epidemiology class to get a grip on danger presented by doing nothing '¦ Health care is not a cost bourne by individuals '¦ It is an investment in people and society. WFM would not provide it to their own employees otherwise. All the WSJ editors did was clarify your position and highlight your own distracting comparison to 'socialism.'</p>
08/14/2009 5:46:00 PM CDT
Mike says ...
<p>I'm very sorry (though not particularly surprised) that the WSJ chose to edit out your paragraphs on the China study and healthy eating, as this was really the only part of your essay that made sense.</p> <p>As for the rest, it seems at best thoughtless, especially coming from someone in a position of relative power.</p> <p>Consider this:</p> <p>Many promoters of fire protection services believe that people have an intrinsic ethical right to fire protection'to trained firemen,<br> rescue equipment and EMS. While all of us can empathize with those whose houses burn down and loved ones die in fires, how can we say that all people have any more of an intrinsic right to fire protection than they have an intrinsic right to food, clothing, owning their own homes, a car or a personal computer? Fire protection is a service which we all need at some point in our lives, but just like food, clothing, and shelter it is best provided through voluntary and mutually-beneficial market exchanges rather than through government mandates. A careful reading of both The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution will not reveal any intrinsic right to fire protection, food or shelter, because there isn't any. This 'right' has never existed in America.</p> <p>Sounds kind of nutty, eh?</p>
08/14/2009 5:51:00 PM CDT

Pages