4,664 Comments

Comments

Peter Leeflang says ...
<p>Dear Mr. Mackey,</p> <p>Thanks you for speaking up, just like Alam Miller did of Universal Health Services.</p> <p>We need more businessmen like you to speak out against socialized medicine and for individual health care insurance.</p> <p>Of course I will be thanking you as well by buying more frequently at your stores, especially now that one opens in Dedham.</p> <p>Just one request: Please bring the plastic bags back as the paper bags fall apart in rain and snow and cannot be bound tight. I know it is tough on you in the current 'green mania', but a good example by you in that area my mean a lot of relief for your buyers.</p>
08/14/2009 8:02:00 PM CDT
pjean says ...
<p>You have done nothing wrong, Mr. Mackey. Some people believe that if you have a differing opinion, you must be silenced. Reasonable Americans believe otherwise.</p>
08/14/2009 8:03:00 PM CDT
Tim Callahan says ...
<p>Mr. Mackey:</p> <p>-Thank you for making your opinions known, because I could not (in good conscience) support a store like Whole Foods, knowing that their leadership is so bereft of common sense. I will NEVER step foot in one of your stores ever again.</p>
08/14/2009 8:04:00 PM CDT
brenty says ...
<p>Wow. What a shame that I have to stop shopping at Whole Foods. I refuse to spend my money to support a person with your views. I am going to pass the word in my 'liberal' community as well. I was in Whole Foods today. Who would have guessed that it would have been my last time?</p>
08/14/2009 8:05:00 PM CDT
Louis Gelb says ...
<p>I'm sure the loss of our business won't impact your company adversely but my wife and I cannot in good conscience continue to shop at Whole Foods.</p>
08/14/2009 8:05:00 PM CDT
Tammy M says ...
<p>Mr. Markey<br> It is so unfortunate that you are so far out of touch with your customer base. Who did you think were the prime consumers of your organic products??? The conservatives that want to drill for oil within the National Parks system?? I would never think about spending another dime at Whole Foods under your management.</p>
08/14/2009 8:06:00 PM CDT
J. King says ...
<p>Bye, bye John, we are now shopping at the Fresh Market. To our surprise, it is better than WholeFoods</p>
08/14/2009 8:06:00 PM CDT
Akiko says ...
<p>You'll loose me. I've been talking to my friends WFM was a wonderful place to shop. But now it won't be like that anymore.</p>
08/14/2009 8:08:00 PM CDT
Andrew says ...
<p>Thank you for contributing something of substance to the national debate. </p> <p>I'm puzzled at the reactionary response you've received from some, but emotion seems to override reason all too quickly these days. Would that your critics would disagree with what you say yet be willing to fight to the death for your right to say it. Considering their seeming willingness to cash in their liberty for a piece of 'security,' it should come as no surprise what a low value they place on a fellow concerned citizen's freedom of speech.</p> <p>My wife and I have never really been 'Whole Foods shoppers.' I can assure you (and your detractors) that we are now.</p>
08/14/2009 8:09:00 PM CDT
yobaby says ...
<p>first things first'¦I WILL BE SHOPPING MORE AT WHOLE FOODS FROM NOW ON!!!!! High 5 &amp; fist bump to mr. mackey!!!!! </p> <p>i find it interesting that for every 'i heart Canadian health care' story, i have heard 10 distressing stories of the Canadian system. Not good'¦and just as mr. mackey points out'¦we have quite a larger population than Canada or the UK. it is an administrative nightmare, not to mention how well our government runs things'¦oh, and let's not forget the corruption that is synonymous with washington dc'¦</p> <p>why we would hand over the reigns to one governmental body with greedy/corrupted intentions'¦which, btw, cannot be sued by you'¦scary! and'¦if health care is a 'right', then why on god's green earth would there be the inevitable rationing that will come down the pike. the government then cannot deny me whatever procedure i want'¦right? LOL!!!!!</p> <p>i will end with a big THANK YOU to this courageous and thoughtful article'¦go get'em tiger!!!</p>
08/14/2009 8:10:00 PM CDT
Thomas Steele says ...
<p>Dear Mr. Mackey,</p> <p> I'm certainly pleased to know what you think regarding the intrinsic 'right' to food clothing and health care. It's good to know that this is the mentality behind Whole Foods. I can assure you I will no longer be shopping at my local Whole Foods here in Tucson. I will also be lending as much syupport as I can to the soon to be announced national boycott of Whole Foods.<br> We should be helping each other sir, not turning our backs on those fellow citizens in need, like the 20,000 or so Americans who die each year because of lack of accessable and affordable quality healthcare.<br> You should be ashamed'¦.your views are not patriotic, not in the least.</p>
08/14/2009 8:10:00 PM CDT
Doug says ...
<p>I think your ideas for health care 'reform' are just plain insulting to a man who has 2 jobs and still can't afford to get insurance.</p> <p>Maybe I'm just too poor for your store, I'll have to shop somewhere else.</p>
08/14/2009 8:12:00 PM CDT
Robert says ...
<p>Here's the email I sent to Whole Foods this morning. Nothing Mr. Mackey has written subsequently has changed my mind (equating health care reform with that fear-mongering word 'socialism' is particularly egregious):</p> <p>'I will no longer shop at Whole foods. Here is why. While the company'in part through its moniker 'whole' and its claim to value community'implies that it is more about selling commodities, John Mackey's WSJ editorial shows that the store is really just about the market. If you can sell healthy food, great. If you can afford health insurance (like healthy food) that the market provides, great. Apparently, you can make a profit selling healthy food. You can also make a profit selling insurance, but not everyone will be able to afford it. Being satisfied with that is not looking at the 'whole' picture, but only at the bottom line. Shame on your CEO.'</p>
08/14/2009 8:13:00 PM CDT
E G says ...
<p>I am dismayed by this article, in both versions. It starts out as a reasonable enough set of suggestions (though I don't agree with all of them), but then takes a very disturbing turn, and there are three points I think need addressing:</p> <p>1) For all the limitations of the NHS, it still provides a basic safety net for every person in Britain. Yes, those that can afford to typically 'top up' with private insurance, but those that can't still have access to doctors and hospitals and preventative care, instead of having to wait till a problem becomes critical to get any care at all, and then risk being bankrupted by it. To focus on the shortcomings only misrepresents the system horribly, and misses how much more civilised it is than a wholly private healthcare 'system'.</p> <p>2) I'm deeply disgusted by your victim-blaming. Yes, many health problems are avoidable, and good public health policy is a much cheaper (and in the long term, more effective) way to tackle those. But many illnesses'not to mention injuries'are not caused by any circumstance under the individual's control. Be it inheritance, sheer bad luck, or subtler social problems like the extreme difficulty of actually getting healthy food in the poorest district of pretty much any American city (hrm'¦ there's something constructive Whole Foods could actually help with if you're so inclined), many people are sick through circumstances entirely beyond their control. Your proposal would do nothing to help them, and merely rubs salt into the wound with a dose of blame for their misfortune.</p> <p>I take this part personally because I am one of these people. In my 20s, while in fine health'not only eating well but training hard at martial arts and doing just about everything right'I was struck by a chronic illness for which the only known risk factor is that it's more common in richer countries than poorer ones. Thank heavens I lived in Britain at the time and had the NHS available to treat me. And thank heavens that since moving to the US, I've been one of the privileged people with access to an employer health plan that is forced by law to accept pre-existing conditions. If I lose that privilege, whether through unemployment or through a change in the law, I will have to move back to Britain because there's no way I (as half of a household earning well above the US median household income, with no dependents) can afford my maintenance medications without insurance cover. And that still makes me a relatively privileged person, because at least I have the option of moving back to a country with a civilised health care system ' without that, the expected outcome would be death from complications of a condition that is perfectly manageable, _to those who can afford the enormous cost of the meds_. I hope you understand the gravity of this point: adequate health care is not some piffling luxury for a person in my position, but the difference between dying young and being able to live a full life, with a chronic illness that is fully under control most of the time.</p> <p>3) In a way this is the most disappointing of all, given that it seems so inconsistent with how you run your company and treat your employees: I'm saddened by the lack of ambition revealed by suggesting that only things spelled out in the Constitution and Declaration of Independence count as rights. Do you really mean to suggest that we should aspire for nothing more for our fellow human beings than could have been imagined centuries ago, when slavery was a social norm, no-one had indoor plumbing or electricity, and there was no such thing as evidence-based medicine? Why should poverty shut people out of the immense gains we have had from a century of medical science? And do you think we'd even have anything like the Constitution or Declaration of Independence if the founding fathers had allowed themselves to be similarly unambitious?</p> <p>There's a lot of hotheaded talk about boycotting Whole Foods among my social circle right now (many of whom, including myself, have been very loyal customers of yours for as long as we've been able to afford your prices). I'm not sure whether I'm going to join that or not, but I can tell you that you've lost a few of my friends' business already, and I'm wavering. For me it really hinges upon how much I believe that the association with the Whole Foods brand was the work of some dastardly editor at News Corporation, as opposed to your original intent from which you're just trying to climb down to save face. I don't have to agree with or like the CEO of a company to shop there, but if I feel that their brand is being used to advance an agenda that endangers my welfare, then I certainly don't want any of my money going to support that.</p>
08/14/2009 8:13:00 PM CDT
J. Fields says ...
<p>Mr. Mackey:</p> <p>I will no longer shop in a store whose CEO has such a pompous, self righteous and erroneous view of the health care crisis in the US or the National Health system in the UK. Sitting where you are, Mr. Mackey I can guarantee you have excellent health care coverage. Do your employees, as well? As an RN who works with patients in the end stages of life, I can tell you from my experience that health care is a RIGHT of all citizens, and not for those fortunate enough to have a job. Take a look at other people's struggles, Mr. Mackey and cultivate something you lack'¦empathy and compassion.</p> <p>J. Fields, RN</p>
08/14/2009 8:15:00 PM CDT
Dawn says ...
<p>THANK YOU!!! I have never shopped at Whole Foods, but will make it a point to try to shop at your store from now on'¦. just to make sure I cancel out someone who is boycotting a store just because someone voiced some alternatives to health care policy. Re-read this people'¦ he is NOT putting anyone down!!! How can people be getting upset over this!</p>
08/14/2009 8:15:00 PM CDT
John C. Randolph says ...
<p>' Those lawsuits are the reason our food supply is safe. '</p> <p>Not even close. </p> <p>The reason our food supply is safe, is because selling unsafe food is a disaster for any business. Look how much Jack-in-the-box lost a couple of years ago when they had that food poisoning incident. The market deals far more damage to a slipshod operation that lets contaminated food get through, than they would ever lose in court.</p> <p>-jcr</p>
08/14/2009 8:16:00 PM CDT
Beth Fletcher says ...
<p>I have a very good friend who died of kidney cancer without the benefit of health insurance or care.</p> <p>In her honor I promise to tell at least one person every day NOT to shop in your stores. I am perfectly capable of losing you seven long time customers in your Montclair store today.</p> <p>It's a bit of a hardship for me but the new Fairway looks great. I'll be giving them a rave review and trashing your 'organic' fare. I sincerely hope that your company tanks.</p>
08/14/2009 8:16:00 PM CDT
LindaP says ...
<p>I am sure any business you lose will be gained by those that agree with you or are opened minded and will at least listen to reason and discuss compromises.</p> <p>Your store in Richmond is 20 miles from me but I will gladly drive that far and just stock up when I am there. I will encourage my like friends who also oppose this government takeover to do the same.</p> <p>Thank you for standing up for what is right for this country and its people.</p>
08/14/2009 8:17:00 PM CDT
Sandra Nelson says ...
<p>John Mackey, Your store has received the last dollar from my family. I want to thank you for showing your true opinion of humanity. You are out of touch with many of your customers, and do not deserve the position you hold.</p>
08/14/2009 8:18:00 PM CDT
tom harner says ...
<p>Dear John Mackey</p> <p>My wife and I have been advocates of single payer since 1992-when we met Paul Wellstone at the Democratic National Convention. Since then, we have been active in The Pennsylvania 4 Progress Bills now in the State House of Pennsylvania- P4P.</p> <p>This bill is funded by a 10 percent tax on all businesses, and a 3 percent tax on all state residents. It includes alternative medicine, as well as long term care, dental, and eyewear. It has great bi-partisan support in both houses of the Pa. Legislation.</p> <p>It is not tied in to your place of employment. Employers will save money and have great coverage. Citizens will be able to make health car choices, and the federal government will not go bankrupt.</p> <p>I would welcome your investigation into our plan, and your feed-back would be appreciated. I would also like to encourage corporate support for alternative therapies within the bill.</p> <p>The health insurance industry has dictated our health care policy for generations-suppressing healthy living issues, and alternative modalities-while rationing and depriving care to millions of citizens.</p> <p>99 percent of Canadians would not trade their health coverage for ours-I noticed that you did not use Canada as an example in your blog. The Pa. plan-more closely resembles this plan than the European Plans.</p> <p>Whole Foods and Whole Health are intricately woven. Affordability is a factor in both cases. When accessibility is 100 percent-education in right living can have a paradigm shifting impact. When uncovered and denied benefits are not bankrupting families, they can afford to eat better and live better.</p> <p>I appreciate your good work and corporate responsibility.</p> <p>Tom Harner</p>
08/14/2009 8:18:00 PM CDT
Andrew C says ...
<p>Bravo Mackey.</p> <p>Yours is a voice of courage and integrity.</p>
08/14/2009 8:19:00 PM CDT
Allen Wood says ...
<p>Mr. Mackey, people who shop at Whole Foods are overwhelmingly supporters of health care reform. We feel betrayed by your opposition to this urgently needed legislation and you will lose our business.</p>
08/14/2009 8:19:00 PM CDT
Marsha says ...
<p>I've been shopping at Whole Foods ever since they opened in Palatine, IL. I'd rather buy less and get higher quality, particularly with fruits, meats and fish. But as a healthcare worker for 36 years I've watched it evolve from a not for profit system to our current system of big business and corporate greed. It is a system that has run many physicians into early retirement, because the fatigue of dealing with insurance companies takes its toll. I believe that everyone who pays taxes in this country deserves to have basic healthcare. My only argument with Obama is that the only way to get special interests out of my doctor's office is to run a single payer public system. We currently have a system where there is no incentive for an insurance company to pay OUT'¦and the harder they make it, the more likely people will give up and pay it themselves or not have a test they need. Medicare already is the single decider for tests being approved. It has to pass muster with medicare before an indication and a test are ok'd by an insurance company. So, given a choice, would I rather have the so-called government doing what they already do'¦.decide if a test is necessary'¦ or a $9 an hour clerk working for an insurance company, telling my doctors office that they won't approve something that should have been approved. The best way the system would save money is to take all of these middlemen out of it- integrate medicare and medicaid and provide equal access to all and make it the not for profit system it should be. It amazes me when the money men talk'¦when money stands in the way of what is the right thing to do.<br> Well'¦MY money will go to Trader Joes' now'at least until their CEO shows his true colors and his insensitivity to his customer base.</p>
08/14/2009 8:19:00 PM CDT
Lewis Wilson says ...
<p>You really have no idea what your saying regarding health care. You simply do not understand the economics of it. I've been shopping at Whole Foods Stores for fifteen years and currently spend $1200-$1500/mo at the two Phoenix stores nearby. I cannot continue to do so. You are no better than those like thye Limbaughs of the world who would rip this country apart because of ignorance, stupidity and/or greed.<br> L.A.W.</p>
08/14/2009 8:20:00 PM CDT

Pages