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Joe says ...
Homeopathic products are simply WATER! The majority of these products are so highly diluted that they do not contain a single molecule of the original substance. In fact, they can not be considered homeopathic if they contain measurable amounts of the substance. Please do not waste your time and money on these pseudoscience snake-oil cures. Water does not have "memory," and if it did, it would "remember" the thousands of different molecules it has come into contact with, including fish poop.
01/21/2008 12:58:10 PM CST
Mike says ...
This is misleading. Oscillo is not made from onion, it is produced from duck heart and duck liver and is not vegan-friendly.
01/21/2008 1:28:53 PM CST
curranm says ...
We appreciate all your comments. Yes, homeopathic medicines are made from mineral, botanical, and biological substances (plant and animal) which are diluted again and again. The body responds to these medicines, even though the exact mechanism is difficult to understand. Research confirms this: “An increasing number of scientific studies on homeopathy are being conducted and, in recent years, more than 150 of these studies have been published in medical journals. Clinical research is providing evidence of the efficacy of homeopathic medicines, and basic laboratory research is confirming the biological activity of highly diluted substances and helping the scientific community better understand their mechanism of action.” (www.boironusa.com FAQs)
01/23/2008 4:04:54 PM CST
Christie says ...
I have to ask, which journals? and how large were these 150 studies? how many of them had significant positive results? was there a control group that was given a placebo? Personally, I feel the claims made about homeopathic remedies can be obtained by a mixture of the placebo effect, and human psychology that causes us to remember the hits and forget the misses. Consumers are told to take Oscillo, at the 1st sign of the flu. This is convenient for a number of reasons: 1) people take more, you sell more 2) most of the time, a sneeze, cough, or stomach ache does not turn into the flu, with or without oscillo 3) if someone does actually does contract the flu while taking Oscillo, the product's failure can be blamed on the fact that the consumer did not take it soon enough. Also, I need to comment on the statement "The body responds to these medicines, even though the exact mechanism is difficult to understand". EXPLAIN IT TO ME.
01/23/2008 6:42:11 PM CST
Celine says ...
When do I take Oscillo? Is it better to take it with food? Do I drink water after taking it?
01/24/2008 9:30:28 AM CST
Joe says ...
Christie raises very good questions. Homeopathy is considered pseudoscientific quackery by a majority of scientists. This in and of itself does not mean that homeopathy is bunk, but it does have the side effect that homeopathy studies are not conducted by leaders in the scientific community. Perhaps because of this, they tend not to be methodologically rigorous. There are VERY few randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials (the "gold standard" of efficacy research), and most of these have very small sample sizes. In response to Christie's question, the truth is that no one understands the "mechanism of action" because the underlying theory is nonsense and defies a basic understanding of chemistry and physics. Consider the following: 1) Homeopathy rests on the "law of similars," the idea that something that causes a symptom can cure the same symptom when taken in highly diluted form. I might actually believe this if I lived in the 1800s, but as a general principle, it sounds silly to me. 2) Many homeopathic substances are so highly diluted that they do not contain a single molecule of the "active" substance. So how, then, can it do anything at all? Classical homeopathy argues that shaking the mixture releases some sort of mystical healing energy which remains even in the absense of a single molecule of the original substance. Supposedly this "vital energy" (which is invisible and unmeasurable) reacts with an individual's "vital spirit" to cure their symptoms. To me, this sounds absolutely insane. Also notice that this "mechanism" is untestable, since "vital energy" is impossible to observe or measure. Some scientists have argued that because of this, homeopathy is not a scientific theory but a metaphysical doctrine. If this mechanism cannot be observed, then it cannot be examined scientifically. 3) Classical homeopathy argues that these remedies become MORE potent each time they are diluted. Let me say that again, to emphasize how utterly insane it is--adding water, and thus decreasing the amount of the active ingredient supposedly makes it stronger. Is there ANYTHING in your daily life that works like this? If you water down your coffee, it gets weaker. If you take 1 aspirin instead of 2, it doesn't work as well. This idea goes completely against conventional medical evidence, which consistently shows "dose-response" curves such that higher concentrations of an active ingredient correspond to stronger effects. Homeopathy claims that lower concentrations correspond to stronger effects, because this mystical energy somehow grows stronger by shaking it. Really????
01/24/2008 8:33:27 PM CST
curranm says ...
Thank you for all of your comments. Homeopathy has been a topic of debate since it was developed in the late 1700s. It’s true that even the experts are not able to scientifically explain how homeopathy works. Like acupuncture, homeopathy recognizes and affects the body’s vital energy, and supports the body’s own healing systems. Please refer to references below for a few attempts at explaining the mechanism of healing and the history. (1-3) At the center of debate are the reasons stated in this discussion: 1) homeopathic medicines are made from substances diluted beyond current capacity of scientific measurement, 2) and the medicines are more powerful when more diluted. These two facts are true, however they are not proof that this system of healing is ineffective. Rather they highlight that scientific methods cannot explain all of the complexities of the human body or its systems. A growing body of research supports the efficacy of these remedies (due to space limitations, please again see reference links below (4-6).) In fact, homeopathy has been shown to work on babies, children, unconscious patients, and even animals; all examples of something more going on than the placebo effect. Homeopathy has provided relief from chronic pain, allergy symptoms, depression, insomnia, and more for millions of people. In Europe it is often prescribed before pharmaceuticals. The debate will no doubt continue; but the fact remains that homeopathy is an affordable healing system with no side effects and the potential to help the body heal itself in many ways. 1) National Center for Homeopathy (NCH) “Homeopathy” (reprinted from Arthritis Today) http://nationalcenterforhomeopathy.org/articles/view,37 2) http://www.tldp.com/issue/11_00/208_11_00/How_Does_Homeopathy_Work.htm by Allen M. Kratz, PharmD. 3) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/096_home.html 4) European Council for Classical Homeopathy http://www.homeopathy-ecch.org/ Search “ENHR (European Network of Homeopathy Researchers) - An Overview of Positive Homeopathy Research and Surveys” 3/07. 5) American Institute of Homeopathy http://homeopathyusa.org/faq.html 6) http://nationalcenterforhomeopathy.org/articles/research.jsp Research (including peer- reviewed journals)
01/29/2008 9:54:16 AM CST
curranm says ...
In response to Celine’s questions, most practitioners do recommend avoiding strong flavors including coffee, mint, and camphor when using homeopathy. Oscillo should be taken at the first sign of flu symptoms, anytime of day. Homeopathic medicines should be taken separate from food, although water is fine. See http://abchomeopathy.com for more information!
01/29/2008 10:00:42 AM CST
Joe says ...
First let me say that I am enjoying this exchange, and I hope you do not interpret my responses as hostile. That said..... You cite several references that discuss the history of homeopathy. I think it will help clarify things to give a little history of Oscillococcinum in particular. In the early 1900s, a French physician named Joseph Roy claimed to have found a universal bacterium that (supposedly) appeared in patients with everything from cancer to syphilis and chickenpox. He named this mysterius germ "oscillococci" and claimed that it was the root cause of all these diseases. Roy further claimed that a prime source of oscillococci was the muscovy duck, which is why this "remedy" is made from duck heart and liver. Now, here is the kicker--since Roy's "discovery," no microbiologist has ever reported seeing this so-called oscillococci. If you go to your nearest University library and search the archives of scientific journals, you will find nothing supporting the existence of this microorganism (there are clinical trials of Oscillococcinum, meaning the highly diluted duck liver preparations sold by Boiron, but no evidence of Roy's bacterium). Further, we now know that many of the conditions that Roy traced back to it (like cancer) are not even caused by bacteria, nor even by anything that Roy could have possibly seen with his microscope. The bottom line is that Oscillococcinum (and homeopothy in general) does NOT have a solid theoretical underpinning. In fact, homeopathy makes outrageous claims which run counter to contemporary scientific understanding. I agree that the fact that homeopathy lacks a clear theoretical underpinning and posits odd and unmeasurable mechanisms is not positive evidence of its inefficacy. However, people claiming its efficacy (and charging consumers for it) should bear the brunt of scientific evidence supporting their claims, particularly in light of the illogical and dubious nature of these claims. So what is the state of scientific evidence bearing on the efficacy of Oscillococcinum? Malia has already cited statements from Boiron (the producer of Oscillococcinum), and several organizations that work to promote homeopathy. Do these summaries support the efficacy of homeopathy? That really depends on what you consider adequate proof. Yes, there are a number of studies, but as I have said, many of these studies include severe methodological flaws that seriously limit their validity. In an efficacy study, this includes randomization to conditions and adequate comparison conditions (preferably a placebo control), which are not included in many of these studies. Another problem is that many of these reports are biased in favor of positive results. For instance, an author may measure ten outcomes and only find positive results on one or two--if the author only reports those two outcomes, this introduces a bias in that there is a greater chance that those results were due to random chance rather than real effects. My own search of the research databases at my library uncovered a few recent, systematic reviews examining the clinical trials of Oscillococcinum. Vickers and Smith (2006) conducted a systematic review of studies examining Oscillococcinum in particular. They conclude that the available evidence does NOT support the claim that Oscillococcinum prevents influenza. They do acknowledge a small, barely significant overall effect on reducing length of illness by a few hours, but this is suspect given the small number of methodologically sound studies and the reporting bias previously mentioned. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16855981 Guo, Pittler, and Ernst (2007) conducted a systematic review of randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials involving Oscillococcinum and other alternative treatments for influenza. They conclude that the available studies are plagued by methodological flaws and small sample sizes, and that these treatments are not supported beyond reasonable doubt. Even among studies showing positive effects, the size of the effects are so small as to be insignificant in a clinical sense. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17976414 Here is another article that discusses various reviews of studies: http://www.acsh.org/healthissues/newsID.632/healthissue_detail.asp A few more quibbles: you say "homeopathic medicines are made from substances diluted beyond current capacity of scientific measurement." This is misleading. The problem is not that science is not advanced enough to measure miniscule dilutions--the problem is that chemically, with these sort of dilutions, it is unlikely that a single molecule of the original ingredient exists. It is not a matter of the sensitivity of measurements--we can measure substances at a molecular level. Search for "homeopathy and Avogadro's constant" for more on this.
01/29/2008 1:04:22 PM CST
curranm says ...
The debate on homeopathy will no doubt outlive us! As is often the case, there is research to support various arguments, and many studies end in the well-known “more research is needed.” Luckily, these days we have access to information to educate ourselves and make the best personal decision. Homeopathy’s healing is counterintuitive to reasoning. The physical matter of the original substances in the medicines cannot be measured because homeopathy is based on energy. Yet homeopathy provides relief from acute and chronic conditions to many people around the world every day. At this point, I think the best direction is to say thank you for all the time and thought that has gone into this discussion. Thank you! I would also like to provide the Whole Foods Market position on Homeopathy: We offer homeopathic remedies at Whole Foods Market as a resource to customers who wish to use them. Homeopathic remedies are safe and not harmful, and we only sell homeopathic remedies manufactured and labeled according to the standards for strength, purity and quality set by the Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia of the United States, as recognized by the Food, Drug and Cosmetic act and regulated by the FDA. We acknowledge that there is disagreement in the scientific community about the effectiveness of homeopathic remedies. A growing body of research supports the efficacy of these remedies, and recent meta-analyses of earlier research suggest that homeopathy can be significantly more effective than placebo. Other studies have cast doubt on the efficacy of these remedies. There is a clear need for further research in this area. We are unaware of any studies which have suggested that homeopathic remedies are harmful or dangerous. Homeopathy is a system of healing which has attracted many avowed followers in its 200+ year history. Because homeopathic remedies are safe and believed by many to be effective, we will continue to carry them in our stores. For more information: http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/096_home.html Linde K, Clausius N, Ramirez G, et al. Are the clinical effects of homeopathy placebo effects? A meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials. Lancet 1997;250:834–43 Kleijnen J, Knipschild P, ter Riet G. Clinical trials of homeopathy. Br Med J 1991;302:316–23
02/01/2008 9:53:44 AM CST
Angie says ...
I think it's great. I have been using it for three years with my family and highly recommend it...
02/19/2008 3:05:56 PM CST
Janice ( organic skin care ) says ...
This was a great podcast, if anyone is interested in learning more about <a>Natural Body Lotions</a> they can visit VillageGreenMarket.com
03/19/2008 4:39:43 PM CDT
Michelle says ...
I found this very informative. I wasn't aware of the homeopathic preventions for cold and flu...I feel like I'm better prepared.
10/23/2009 9:15:33 PM CDT
Kari says ...
This product sounds fantastic!
10/25/2009 3:34:10 PM CDT
Tricia Kingsbury says ...
Oscillo sounds like a very "easy to take" natural product! I would use it for me and for my son!
10/23/2009 11:52:45 AM CDT
Dwayne Lamoureaux says ...
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06/05/2011 1:41:44 PM CDT
bepkom says ...
Alba: We have a large variety of natural and homeopathic remedies, however because product selection can vary so much between stores we suggest contacting your nearest location to see if they have a product you're looking for.
04/08/2011 3:08:09 PM CDT
Alba says ...
Do you have medication for tinnitus?
04/07/2011 6:56:13 PM CDT
writing jobs says ...
Spot on with this write-up, I really think this website needs way more consideration. I’ll in all probability be again to learn way more, thanks for that info.
09/15/2011 4:09:21 AM CDT
Dylan Hawley says ...
Just so you all know, Boiron is being sued for false claims about this product... Also, it's made from duck liver and heart, just in case you're interested in these kinds of ingredients... I've taken Oscillococcinum before and am very upset about these findings... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oscillococcinum
10/04/2011 2:30:00 PM CDT

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