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The Official Whole Foods Market® Blog

 

50 Comments

Comments

Alice Marzolf says ...
I love to place small vases of cut flowers in different rooms of my house and I find that used glass jars and bottles make great vases for this purpose because they come in a variety of shapes and sizes. They also look pretty with the stems of the flowers showing and it is easy to see when water needs to be added. They are also easy to wash and keep clean. I also like to use them for flowers on the table on my deck for picnics and parties. The glass bottles and jars can be made especially attractive by placing a ribbon around the middle and tying a nice bow.
08/02/2007 8:59:09 PM CDT
patti connelly says ...
I reuse glass containers by filling them with all of the bulk nuts and seeds I purchase and storing them in the fridge. This way, the paper bulk bags don't absorb the oils from the nuts, the nuts don't go stale and I have fresh nuts and seeds for snacking and/or baking always on hand readily viewable when I open the refrigerator. Then I reuse the paper bulk bags for my kids lunches or save in my "paper box" next to the fireplace.
08/02/2007 9:12:53 PM CDT
Libby Jennison says ...
Reuse are reduce are easily the two overlooked of the three R's-- reduce, reuse, recycle. In terms of reusing items, I find glass jars have many uses, including the many that were already mentioned above. In addition to those, I like using the jars for sun steeped tea. I fill the jar with room temperature water and a few tea bags, depending on the size of the jar and the amount of water. Then I set it outside in the sun for a few hours until it is steeped. There is an energy savings from not using the stove, as well as the reuse of the jar. I usually end up putting these in the refrigerator for iced homebrews, and label them with a sharpie according to the nature of the day they were made: Dreamy Jasmine, Lazy Brew, Sweaty Earl... It's a good idea to keep a closer eye on white teas, like jasmine, that have a tendancy to get bitter if left to steep for too long. If that's the case, and you find yourself with a bitter jasmine, pour over ice instead of refrigerating. The melting of the ice will dilute the tea. Still bitter? I've found that perfumey iced teas, like jasmine or earl, are really good over ice with milk and a touch of honey. They are good blended into a slushie too. Happy Brewing!
08/02/2007 11:12:35 PM CDT
Carole A. Howard says ...
After removing labels, washing, & drying, I love to use my empty glass jars - especially some of the jelly jars that come with the glass handles, for serving iced tea, lemonade, iced coffee, juices, or mixed drinks. Some of those jelly jars have thick enough glass to serve hot coffee or tea instead of in a regular mug for breakfast. These are great for backyard picnics, luncheons, or brunches - save them up for a "set" of glasses or mix n' match as you like! All of my friends love being served in these "glasses" - keep an eye out for some of the ones that have raised glass designs on the front of the jars. [Kids love these, too, as they can see what is inside their "glasses" - serve kids different colored juices at a party - really brightens up the table!
08/03/2007 1:05:31 AM CDT
Sommer says ...
We use them to store dried herbs from our garden. That way we can enjoy homegrown parsley, basil, thyme, etc. all winter long! Mustard, caper, and other condiment jars are particularly attractive and can be left on the counter for easy access while cooking.
08/03/2007 7:44:00 AM CDT
G says ...
I reuse my glass containers by removing the labels, washing them, and reusing them for storage containers. We don't use plastic bags or plastic containers, and the reused glass jars are free! We use them for everything, from storing leftovers, to storing opened bags of cereal, beans, anything that came in a plastic bag. What a positive impact on your pocketbook, the environment, and on your health, if everyone stopped using this much plastic!
08/03/2007 9:06:08 AM CDT
Char says ...
I am using my jars for change. I have them in a cabinet and show them to my grandson and let him know that this is for "Disneyland" when he is five! He may not understand this but helps put the change in the jar which may actually be teaching him to save!
08/03/2007 9:32:04 AM CDT
Diana Hunt says ...
I borrowed an idea from a friend: take the shortest string of mini Christmas lights (usually about 25 lights) and coil it in a quart jar. Add potpourri in the middle. When you plug in the lights, they warm the potpourri, providing both a soft scent and a pleasant glow. This is a lovely thing to put in the bathroom for a nightlight or for guests, especially around the holidays. You can vary the colors of the lights by the holiday (e.g., red, white and blue for Fourth of July!). If you have outside electrical access, you can plug in one of the Christmas tree cords with spaced outlets, and use these jars to illuminate a patio or deck. Just make sure they are placed so no one will trip over the cords!
08/03/2007 10:04:23 AM CDT
Beverly Nussbaum says ...
I love to recycle glass jars. Almost everything edible that I buy in bulk or in paper packaging gets tranferred to a clean recycled glass jar when I get home: coffee beans, grains, flours, nuts, rice, small pastas, dried peas and beans, snack mixes, granola, olives. I also use them to store perishables and leftovers in the fridge. Recycled jars provide sturdy storage that protects the contents from odors, critters, and oxidation. The transparency enables me to see what's inside and reminds me to use something up or buy some more when the supply is running low. The jars come in all sizes, clean easily in the dishwasher, and best of all, they are free.
08/03/2007 12:03:54 PM CDT
Libby Jennison says ...
I like the idea of using them for doorstops, Kath, and it also gave me an idea... my boyfriend has a really nice hollowed gourd that he filled with sand... but he uses it as an incense holder-- just sticks it into the sand, and lets the ashes fall into the sand. I think I'll try that with a wide mouthed jar.
08/03/2007 2:11:04 PM CDT
Jan Waldhoff says ...
I usually like to have more than just a cup of tea or I make a smoothie breakfast. The normal 16 oz cup or glass is not enough. I use it a glass, it is great and if I need a large glass of water. I don’t care if they get broke. Storing things like garlic that makes containers smell who care if it is a jar that you can recycle when it gets broken or needs to be replaced.
08/03/2007 2:38:48 PM CDT
Helena says ...
In the summer, I use glass jars and the hot interior of my parked car to make yogurt. I put scalded, cooled milk with yogurt starter in an assortment of glass jars (which I place inside a baking dish to make carrying them about easier), and then I put the whole thing in the passenger footwell of my car. After 4 or 5 hours on a hot summer day, I have delicious creamy homemade yogurt. Then I just put lids on the jars and put them in the fridge. This does take a little advance planning but it is pretty effortless for a great product.
08/07/2007 5:47:55 PM CDT
W James Hadden Jr says ...
Why does reuse of glass containers have to relate to consumption-driven outdoor parties? Isn't it enough to clean and save jar and lid? We most often do this when we preserve fruits or jellies—we use new lids in these cases, but reuse both jars and tightening bands. When we make pesto, hummus, or a variety of tomato sauces, we always turn to previously-used yoghurt or dipping-sauce containers. We do call a halt at road-kill plastic water bottles!
08/09/2007 2:19:24 AM CDT
Karen Goldberg says ...
I am saving all of those jars from our Sweet Leaf Tea Lemonade for a science project for my son's class. They will be dying some water and mixing it will other liquids of different densities. When they shake it up, it will be a wonderfully colorful mixture. When it sits for a short bit, they liquids will settle based on their densities and separate. The mason jars seal well so it will be something good to take home and share with friends. Learning in class is one thing but when a kid can take it home and retell the lesson to someone else, it takes on a whole new life.
08/10/2007 3:39:31 PM CDT
barbara says ...
I save my jars for storage of my sewing and craft supplies, herbs I dry from my garden, current bugs to identify, dog cookies I make for my poochies and give away, decorated gift jars to fill with candy at holidays, collections of marbles, rocks, loose change,....hope. the wider the mouth the better, glass only of course.
08/14/2007 9:11:52 AM CDT
m huse says ...
We use glass jars for many things, incluing many of those listed above. While I like to recycle as much as possible, cleaning the jars can be very wasteful of water usage. This is minimized by washing other dishes on top of the jars first to both clean them and loosen rhe labels, soaking stubborn ones by leaving in used dishwater with some hot water added, waiting until a bunch of labels need soaking and by diverting the dishwasher discharge water into a dishpan (use gloves to empty-do not touch woth your skin!) for soaking.
08/18/2007 9:41:44 AM CDT
Sean O'Connor says ...
I re-use jars to store smaller items to keep them all organized. One is full of change.
08/26/2007 10:50:50 PM CDT
amy says ...
I keep my glass bottles to simply drink out of them. these could be jam bottles, milk bottles, pasta sauce, etc. After cleaning them and removing the labels, they take on a very different look. they have characters that you wouldn't have notice before. they come in various sizes so you can use them all different purposes: a small glass of juice, a big glass of water, and good glass of ice-tea. they brighten up your glassware collection and make it fun.
08/30/2007 5:07:24 PM CDT
Nina says ...
We reuse our glass containers (with the glass lids) from candles for spices and herbs. They look great and we are recycling. Purchase the candles with the lighter scents as it is much easier to thoroughly clean the jars and lids, the plastic portion of the lids sometimes retain some of the candle scent. We usually stay with vanilla or mocha scented candles.
09/15/2007 5:09:31 PM CDT
Jessica Swartley says ...
I love glass jars! We use them for everything. I am a pickle fanatic so we have alot of pickle jars. I sterelize them before I use them. If the label has a nice look to it I will leave it on and use it for a center piece with candles or tee flowers floating in water. I also like to cut out pictures and modge podge photos all around it or magazine and newpaper clipping so you can see the candle light from the inside. Be creative and have fun.
10/04/2007 9:02:01 AM CDT
Mary Ann says ...
I use my glass jars in combination with my FoodSaver. They have lids that can be purchased to be used on (wide or small mouth) mason jars. Once the air is sucked out of the jars, the flavor and freshness of the food lasts longer. They can be used on dry ingredients such as coffee beans & nuts or left-overs in the fridge. Anything that can stretch my food dollar has a star in my book.
11/26/2007 6:41:05 PM CST
Marguerite says ...
after cleaning the jars, besides using them for storage containers as many have mentioned, I also use them as sterile outdoor drinking jars. I put fresh lemonade in them and can park the jar almost anywhere and not worry about dust or bugs getting into my drink. It's great!
01/18/2008 9:56:11 PM CST
Tracey Sullivan says ...
I reuse jars to store left over items that have strong odors, such as scallions, onions, chives, and garlic. the seal is air tight, and they last longer than using plastic wrap or foil.
10/14/2008 9:36:12 PM CDT
Wendy says ...
My sister reuses her glass jars as drinking glasses for her and her family. She loves how different they all are. Small jars for juice, large jars for water etc.
09/12/2009 8:18:54 AM CDT
fran says ...
I love glass jars too. However so many of the lids have strong odors that I find impossible to remove, and I can't find replacement lids. Any suggestions on how to banish lid odors?
09/20/2009 5:43:05 PM CDT

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