Whole Story

The Official Whole Foods Market® Blog

 

337 Comments

Comments

Meghan says ...
Careful weekly meal planning using seasonal ingredients has been a real money saver for us. We also tend towards simpler recipes that don't require a million ingredients and that make lots of food that can be frozen for use in later weeks, like homemade pizza crust and black bean burgers. We also buy quality ingredients in bulk for a real savings. A vegetarian diet with lots of beans and whole grains helps, too!
10/07/2009 1:09:36 PM CDT
Kelly Benson says ...
I get the good stuff for less by using "The Grocery Game" website to help me find the best deals and coupons. I also check Whole Deal for coupons and meal tips. Also since there's just two of us, I rely on the bulk foods section to get just enough of what we're going to eat instead of spending more and wasting a larger package.
10/07/2009 1:09:42 PM CDT
David Fitzgerald says ...
The best tips are to buy quality foods in bulk and freeze what you don't use immediately. I find that buying organic often gets you fresher food that lasts longer as well, compared to fruits and vegetables that are bought in a regular grocery store and flown in from all over the world. Don't shop when you are hungry. You will end up impulse buying much more than you need.
10/07/2009 1:09:46 PM CDT
Tracy says ...
Plan all of your meals. Base your meal plan on what's in season. Fresh fruits and vegetables that are in season are tastier, more nutritious and almost always less expensive than those that have been shipped in from far away (and better for the environment too). Use your meal plan to make your shopping list and stick to the list when shopping. Stick to the outside aisles of the store (produce, deli, dairy and dairy substitutes) for the bulk of your purchases. Select items from the center aisles sparingly. These aisles tend to have mostly convenience and processed foods that are more expensive and less nutritious. Wash, chop, and prepare your own food rather than buying foods that are pre-packaged this way. When preparing meals, make enough to freeze some leftovers in individual serving containers so that you will have your own frozen meals that can be used for easy work lunches or dinners when you don’t feel like cooking. Buy a reusable water bottle and use it. Buy gourmet coffee beans and grind and prepare your own to keep from buying coffee out. If you travel a lot (like I do) buy healthy, easy to transport food like trail mix, yogurt, protein bars, and fresh fruit to eat at the airport and on the plane. This will save a LOT of money over airport prices. When you want quick, convenient food select items from the food bars rather than going to a restaurant. This is much healthier and less expensive than a restaurant.
10/07/2009 1:11:30 PM CDT
LDY says ...
I find I don't have to compromise on the quality if I shop what's on sale (also gives me a chance to try new things); buy the 365 brand products (which are sometimes even better than the others); buying in bulk (only on items I use frequently); and finally, by having a shopping list. The last item may seem silly but I find I buy a lot less snacks and miscellaneous items when I go with a plan. I try to have my list seperated out into sections of the store so I am not going back and forth for items I overlooked on my list. This keeps me from walking by all those display shelves of stuff I don't have on my list. Of course, there is always exceptions to sticking to the list, but it really does help save!
10/07/2009 1:19:19 PM CDT
Kara Clark says ...
I buy the 365 brand and always look at the weekly sale flier. If meat is on sale, I buy more and freeze it for later use.
10/07/2009 1:19:40 PM CDT
Michelle says ...
I buy only in-season vegetables, and those I can, like butternut squash, I cut up and freeze so I can use them any time. I buy staples, and treats, when they are on sale in quantities that will last for a while. Then I meal plan with what I have on hand. This saves a lot of money and ensures my family always eats high quality, healthy meals.
10/07/2009 1:21:20 PM CDT
Charissa says ...
I love everything about Whole Foods - I buy in bulk where I can, I buy sale and store brand items as much as possible but perhaps for me most importantly is I go to the store a few times per week so I buy my fresh ingredients in small inexpensive amounts and have less waste that way!
10/07/2009 1:21:41 PM CDT
Kim says ...
Like everyone else, I shop sales, buy bulk and use coupons. I also buy potted herbs to add flavor to my cooking year round. One family favorite is my homemade pizza. I make the dough (which is also used for foccacia & bread sticks) using bulk flour, prepare a simple sauce with canned tomatoes, garlic and herbs, and top it off with onions, mushrooms, cheese and some fresh basil. The dough takes a few minutes to prepare and you can get a few interesting toppings from the salad bar.
10/07/2009 1:22:35 PM CDT
Lisa Hejny says ...
I match sales with coupons to get the lowest possible price, and it helps me feed my family of two on only $50 a week.
10/07/2009 1:23:13 PM CDT
Jackie says ...
I definitely do a combination of a lot of the things other people have said: Make a list and stick to it, Use coupons from the newsletter, Check the store for specials, and Buy the 365 brand. I also keep in mind the things I still have at home, so I don't accidentally buy too much of something. Because I'm only cooking for one, I tend to make 2-3 portions at once and refrigerate or freeze the extra portions to eat later. Lastly I take advantage of interesting deals- a Whole Foods in Austin had a promotion that if you bought a pound of organic sliced turkey, you'd get a half pound of cheese, a loaf of bread and 5 small apples for free. I had lunch for a whole week that way- at $2 per lunch!
10/07/2009 1:25:21 PM CDT
Mia says ...
1. Homemade snacks - granola bars, cookies, crackers, etc. are all super-expensive compared to buying the individual ingredients and whipping up a batch at home. Find a recipe, make a huge batch, and stick baked/homemade goods in the freezer for prolonged storage. 2. Shop seasonally and rely on high-quality canned/jarred items - heirloom tomatoes are great in summer, but during the rest of the year, I buy organic canned tomatoes. Same goes with other foods: fresh berries in summer, frozen in winter; fresh artichokes in spring; marinated artichoke hearts during the rest of the year. Canned/frozen fish is also a great money-saver. High-quality canned tuna and sardines are healthy, delicious, and incredibly inexpensive.
10/07/2009 1:26:55 PM CDT
kate townsend says ...
i LOVEthe 365 frozen stuff. for a quick an easy dinner, i buy a 365 cheese pizza and top it with the 365 "stoplight peppers" (red, green and yellow bell peppers already diced), easy and pretty healthy. in addition, we make breakfast smoothies using frozen mangos, blueberries and raspberries...the bags last usually a week and i add only fresh earth bananas, 365 orange juice and some greek yogurt. my daughter and i love them!
10/07/2009 1:29:01 PM CDT
Elizabeth Quigley says ...
Hello, I cook from scratch and buy in bulk.The best way i have cut our food bill and still feed my family real food is I have pared down the list of products we use. I have a standard list of basics I buy every month. These are things I use for baking and my scratch cooking. I buy them once a month. Then weekly I buy fresh foods. Blessings, Elizabeth
10/07/2009 1:29:54 PM CDT
Holly says ...
I get the good stuff for less by simply looking at the very top and bottom shelves at the grocery store. You will be able to find the exact same organic item like pasta or sun-dried tomatoes for a lot less. Often times the store brand or a smaller company's items are placed there. You can save as much as $2-3 by simply looking up... or down! I always leave Whole Foods with a full cart and never spend over $50- including meat.
10/07/2009 1:30:42 PM CDT
Kristen says ...
I spend under $100/week at whole foods for a family of 4! (3 year old and 8 month old) Since I make all my younger son's baby food, I buy a about half of the organic veggies frozen. You save a lot this way, and I don't have to make it all at once. I always stick to the perimeter of the store. Produce, fish/meats/poultry, bakery. I ALWAYS buy what's on sale in the weekly flyers. Whatever is on sale is what's for dinner that week!
10/07/2009 1:30:47 PM CDT
Tessa says ...
Taking the time to look at what's on sale and then plan your weekly meals accordingly. Stocking up on panty items or things that can be frozen when on sale also helps.
10/07/2009 1:31:28 PM CDT
Tessa says ...
Taking the time to look at what’s on sale and then plan your weekly meals accordingly. Stocking up on pantry items or things that can be frozen when on sale also helps.
10/07/2009 1:32:35 PM CDT
Jill says ...
I like to buy Organic 365 products, as they are typically cheaper than some other brands. I also base my produce shopping on the sales, you can easily come up with receipes for the week based on what you are buying on sale. Don't look at the unit prices; look at the price per ounces. This will tell you which comparable product is cheaper per ounce!
10/07/2009 1:34:24 PM CDT
Caroline says ...
I have to drive and hour to get to the nearest Whole Foods. I try to make sure that I'm doing other things in Nashville in order to save money on gas. Having a son with celiac brings challenges, especially since the rest of us do not have it. So with the gluten-free list in hand (and a notebook), I went to Whole Foods to price shop and use my coupons. Two of which I printed offline and then I used the coupons in the store newsletter. I spent 3 hours, writing down prices and comparing using the coupons, verses not using them. I also pointed out to the employee in the gluten-free section that one of their specials is gluten-free and it isn't marked with a gluten-free sticker! Plus I had a coupon for that too! The Think Thin bars are 10 for $10, and my son loves those! Also, the gluten-free pretzels, $1.00 off coupon for those, too. Then as I was still standing in the gluten-free section trying to match up my 10 page list with the items on the shelf, one of the employees and I started talking and I she gave me a box of 365 bread mix flour so I could compare it to one of the others. We were discussing which one tastes better and I said, I don't know, I've never made them at the same time. Guess I will now! Used the coupon for the Van's products for gluten-free french toast sticks. Used the coupon for he Glutino barbeque chicken pizza. Used the coupon for the Gluten-Free Pantry all purpose flour. Used the coupon for vitamin water. I think that's about it. Oh, I forgot to mention that I drove to Nashville for a focus group, so I was able to use that money ($40) to buy the food!
10/07/2009 1:37:16 PM CDT
Amy Murphy says ...
I go where the best coupon policies are! If you stack store coupons with manufacturer's coupons AND a sale, you can get great stuff for pennies or free! I haven't paid over $1 for a Kashi Product in months, and a week ago I was able to get 4 Kid's Cliff Bars for $.29 each because I hit a sale with just the right coupons. It's totally doable to eat well for less. You just have to be savvy about it.
10/07/2009 1:37:56 PM CDT
Rachel Roberts says ...
The best way to save money on organic food, is to buy it from a farmers market or grow your own!
10/07/2009 1:48:18 PM CDT
Jennifer Trently says ...
One of the ways I eat healthy and save money at the same time to make my own baking mix that I can use for pancakes and coffee cake etc. I buy all of the dry ingredients in bulk and then make up my own baking mix and then whenever I want to whip something up all I have to do is add eggs and milk plus I use whole wheat flour combined with regular flour and soy flour in my dry ingredients to make all of my baking healthier.
10/07/2009 1:50:58 PM CDT
Jackie says ...
Even in a down economy, I don't compromise on eating good, healthy food; I just eat smarter and eat less. My boyfriend and I started to make weekly menu's on the weekends for the upcoming week and take into account nights we might come home late from work, nights we have plans, and think of meals that fit accordingly (i.e. - A large pot of chili could be made early in the week and heated for dinner on nights you're out late or just don't feel like cooking). That way, we only shop once a week for all items needed throughout the week, instead of take multiple trips to the store during the week. This streamlines dinner time and opens up your evenings too so you don't spend it stressing over what to prepare the moment you get home. I'm also a big fan of buying from bulk bins and rely on pantry staples like pasta and crushed tomatoes on nights I am out of culinary inspiration.
10/07/2009 1:51:29 PM CDT
may says ...
Waste not, want not. Store properly the food stuff purchased so your money doesn't go down the drain as it were. Wrap and store properly cooked food for use in wonderful left-over unique recipes. I have a relative from PEI who is such a fabulous cook that her left-over meals make any celebrity chef's creations pale in comparison with her meals. She always takes special care when storing cooked or uncooked food. Make use of sales. Consider buying a freezer.
10/07/2009 1:53:23 PM CDT

Pages