Whole Story

The Official Whole Foods Market® Blog

 

79 Comments

Comments

Esperanza Dodge says ...
I was always taught to have a teaspoon of local honey daily to counteract allergies.
04/27/2008 3:01:35 PM CDT
katie daniels says ...
My Daughter has nut allergies hopefully this site will be helpful..
04/27/2008 3:34:31 PM CDT
Robyn says ...
So much good info for my family. I have horrible seasonal allergies and my son has peanut allergy. We'll definitely be trying probiotics.
04/27/2008 4:20:41 PM CDT
MamaBird/SurelyYouNest says ...
Thanks for the interesting info about probiotics.
04/27/2008 7:52:37 PM CDT
Carrie H. says ...
Thanks for this information. I've heard of probiotics but am unsure of how to introduce them to my dairy-allergic daughter. We do give her flax seed when we can - mixed in with other items that she eats.
04/28/2008 8:54:14 AM CDT
Amy M. says ...
Thank you for all this great information. I haven't explored any of these avenues yet, but will look further.
04/28/2008 10:24:00 AM CDT
Kerry Penton says ...
I found the probiotic approach interesting, I'd never heard of or considered it for my dairy-allergic daughter.
04/28/2008 10:45:19 AM CDT
Andrea Casadei says ...
I definitly agree that probiatics made a difference in our diets!
04/28/2008 6:52:09 PM CDT
Andrea Casadei says ...
I definitly agree that probiatics made a difference in our diets! My son has bad season allergies and severe tree nut allergies.
04/28/2008 6:53:36 PM CDT
Christine Saulter says ...
I believe in using probiotics, but have always been hesitant since my son is severely allergic to dairy and it is hard to find SAFE choices. I really like the information, though. MD's won't usually give you any of this info.
04/29/2008 7:52:55 AM CDT
Tricia McCammack says ...
These podcasts have been very helpful. All three of my children are allergic to dairy and I look forward to supplementing some of these options into our life. Thanks!
04/29/2008 2:34:10 PM CDT
Glenda Kiesewetter says ...
I think that what I got out of it is that water is really important for the mucous to stay moist to help defend allergens, as well as I would like to try some of the homeopathic nasal sprays that are offered at whole foods.
04/29/2008 7:05:52 PM CDT
Stretch Mark Mama says ...
The info on good fats was particularly helpful, esp concerning keeping the gut healthy and fighting off the allergic response. Thanks!
04/29/2008 8:03:32 PM CDT
Sarah Fischer says ...
Diet and allergies are linked together. wow I would have never guessed. I want to try supplements for allergies. Sarah F
04/29/2008 11:37:25 PM CDT
John says ...
Nice information!
04/30/2008 7:10:08 AM CDT
Kathy H. says ...
Great info, especially on probiotiocs.
05/01/2008 12:48:45 AM CDT
curranm says ...
Thanks for your comments and questions. Regarding amounts of EFAs for children, here are some details: EFA supplementation for babies? The Institute of Medicine (IOM) tells us that the adequate intake for omega-3s for infants is 0.5 g/day, which is based on average breast milk levels. (Breast milk or fortified formula should supply adequate omega-3s up to 6 months, so no supplementation should be needed for baby if mom's intake and/or the formula is adequate. After 6 months, a combination of breast milk and complementary foods should supply adequate intake. If complementary foods and breast milk or formula are not supplying the recommended 0.5 g/day, we recommend working with your health care provider to determine the best course of action for supplementation. (Note that if supplementation is recommended, wait until at least a year for fish oil supplements due to allergy concerns. Instead, consider algal-derived DHA supplements or DHA-enriched foods.) Essential fat supplements for toddlers: The “Children’s DHA” product from Nordic Naturals is for ages 3 and over. In this case, contacting the company will be the best way to find out the rationale regarding product age recommendations. www.NordicNaturals.com or 800-662-2544. Most of the children’s EFA products on the market are chewable or in liquid form.
05/01/2008 8:13:33 AM CDT
curranm says ...
Probiotics for kids? Yes! there are specific probiotic supplements available for children, actually. See the box for dosage details, or contact the company directly for more specific information. Of course, food is a great way to get them too – look for yogurt with live active cultures.
05/01/2008 8:22:00 AM CDT
curranm says ...
Omega 3s for those who are allergic to fish and seafood: Walnuts, flaxseeds (ground), pumpkin seeds, hemp seeds, and canola oil are all sources of omega 3 EFAs in the diet. Omega-3 enriched eggs are also helpful. There are dairy-free omega-3 supplements available as well, such as flaxseed oil. Thanks!
05/01/2008 8:24:01 AM CDT
curranm says ...
Probiotics for kids? Dairy-free probiotics? Yes to both questions! For children: There are specific probiotic supplements available for all ages, actually. See the box for dosage details, or contact the company directly for more specific information. Of course, food is a great way to get them too – look for yogurt with live active cultures. Dairy-free: Yes, many probiotic formulas may contain dairy, but there ARE dairy-free probiotic products available. One name to look for is SOLGAR. They have several probiotic powders and capsules that fit the bill. They have children's products too. Thanks!
05/01/2008 8:28:57 AM CDT
Sara B. says ...
I love probiotics and am glad that they're keeping people informed.
05/01/2008 9:25:26 AM CDT
Stacey says ...
I had heard about probiotics for GI issues, but not allergies. Interesting
05/01/2008 8:21:21 PM CDT
Allison says ...
when probiotics break down in your belly it makes hydrogen peroxide which give the enzymes necessary to digest lactose. If you buy 35 percent food grade hydrogen peroxide instead of the acidphilus tablets which is ingestible (unlike the 7 percent topicle H202 that is not meant for ingesting) you will find it is the least expensive (you only need 3 drops per quart) You have to be very careful though handling it with gloves, it can burn the skin. I use dish gloves when I put a few drops into a quart of water or juice daily and drink it. The Only place I could find food grade H202 in my area (Ann Arbor, MI) is the Better Health Food Store across from Trader Joe's on Washtenaw Ave. Most places sell it only in the topical 7 percent grade form. Another thing, most people don't know is it is the enzymes in milk that are killed during pasturization that help digest lactose... you may want to try raw milk from goats or cows and make your own yogurt with kefir and raw milk cheeses too to avoid lactose intolerance. To make your own yogurt... All you need it a glass of raw milk and a little piece of kefir placed on the edge... the kefir will grow and live forever. You can break off a piece and share with friends. :-D Just put the milk and kefir on the counter overnight everynight and walla you got your own yogurt fresh made daily. BTW - another thing most people don't know is that human breast milk contains natural occuring hydrogen peroxide. Colostrum has the highest levels. That's why babies get the best benefit from breast feeding. But if a child has allergies to breast milk... it may be the mother is not producing enough of the main enzymes in her body that come from food she eats passed onto her baby to help the baby digest the fat, sugar or protein in their own body... Enzymes in our bodies are divided into two groups and created by our cells: digestive enzymes and metabolic enzymes. There are three types of digestive enzymes amylase, protease and lipase. Amylase, found in saliva, pancreatic and intestinal juices; breaks down carbohydrates (sugars). Protease, found in stomach, pancreatic and intestinal juices; helps digest proteins. Lipase, found in stomach and pancreatic juices also enters the body via food we eat; breaks down fats. So if you don't produce enough of these enzymes naturally. You need help from good raw food sources that give you those enzymes. I just wish we had more raw resources available on the market. I'm sad to say, I get my own raw milk from a farm up north who is not presently accepting any more cow share contracts at this time. BUT Whole Foods does sell raw milk ROSEWOOD Cheddar Cheese - that is an excellent source of dairy food! It comes in mild, medium and sharp. We buy the mild and eat it daily for snacks and at bedtime. It does not hurt my one son and husband who are both lactose intolerant.
11/20/2008 7:09:32 PM CST
Johanna says ...
Water kefir and kombucha are dairy free sources of probiotics. We serve mixed with herbal tea or fruit juice. Culturing your own is simple and cost effective. Fermented foods [think traditional sauerkraut or kimchi] have same or better health benefits since the foods don't lose nutrient value as with cooking. Cultures For Health dot com has great info and resources on those things. As for grain sensitivities, some people swear by sprouting and/or soaking. We do a bit of both, because it takes some planning and we work fulltime. Nourishing Traditions is a good read to get the basics, but it could be overwhelming for some. There's no one real magical solution but Real Food. Previous Poster Janet is on to something saying how we sterilize all the healthy symbiotic nutrients from our foods. Just make the changes you're comfortable with and see where it takes you!
04/18/2010 3:14:07 PM CDT
barbara j mcgrath says ...
i am looking for protease capsules. hhow many brands and are they worth it?
04/26/2010 7:17:39 PM CDT

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