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Busting Myths about Fresh Pineapple

By Carol Medeiros, April 11, 2010  |  Meet the Blogger  |  More Posts by Carol Medeiros
MonkeysOnce in a while we have a new program in produce that is super exciting, and Whole Trade pineapple is one of those programs. First off, the fruit is delicious! But in addition to taste, there are plenty of reasons that we can’t stop talking about this fruit. Whole Trade pineapple is grown on farms that meet high social and environmental standards. Our purchases of this fruit contribute back to the communities that produced it (check out Matt’s blog to get the full story). Additionally, one percent of the retail sale goes to the Whole Planet Foundation, aiding in the fight against poverty in developing countries. That’s a lot of good things packed into a piece of fruit! As we got ready to launch this program, our team visited the farms and brought back reports about pineapple growing, harvesting and selection. As they shared the scoop, it came to light just how many myths there are out there about selecting pineapple. Here are just a few that we came across!
  • Myth #1: Never buy a green pineapple, it is not ripe. The scoop: Pineapples are fully ripe when green and color is not an indicator of ripeness or flavor.
  • Myth #2: If the leaves on top pull out easily, it means it's ripe.
  • The scoop: Contrary to popular belief, this is not necessarily a sure sign of ripeness. Pineapples are picked when ripe and do not ripen after harvest. Our Whole Trade pineapple is picked at peak ripeness!
  • Myth #3: Choosing a pineapple at the store is tricky business. The scoop: Selecting pineapple is quite simple! Choose fruit that looks fresh- look for sturdy green leaves and firm, consistent fruit. Avoid fruit that looks dry or dehydrated.
  • Myth #4: Cutting a whole pineapple is lots of work. The scoop: Cutting a pineapple takes just a few minutes and is pretty easy. Below are some basic instructions!
  • Pineapple Slicing

    If you have not had a chance to try one (or you just aren’t buying the myth-busting!) ask a Team Member for a taste next time you are in your local store. I am sure that the fruit will surprise you!
    Category: Whole Trade

     

    22 Comments

    Comments

    Larry Chandler says ...
    I wish you would replicate this program for Mangoes. This is a fruit that many people have never tried & don't understand. You have an opportunity to educate, increase your sales, and help responsible growers. None of the Whole Foods stores I have visited have any signage that indicates the variety of Mangoes offered. You do this for apples, pears, oranges, etc. Personally, I don't care for the Haden and Tommy Atkins varieties (too stringy). My favorites are Kent and Keitt. I have read that the Alphonso from India is considered the best tasting, but I have never seen one. Why don't you offer these?
    04/15/2010 10:07:51 PM CDT
    Jodell Hinojosa says ...
    Good teaser - too bad it gave no real information...
    04/13/2010 9:15:10 AM CDT
    Jane Windberg says ...
    Grew up in Hawaii - My Dad picked and bought pineapples straight out of the fields. I say that the SMELL determines ripeness and sweetness. I believe a pineapple may be ripe but not necessarily sweet. If I buy one that is a little tart, I will slice and dry it. Drying brings out sweetness. If too ripe, I will make sorbet or use in a smoothie or juice it with other fruits and yogurt or almond milk. Fresh pineapple is wonderful and I happen to eat the core which is full of fiber! Worked in a cannery when in high school - fun and educational.
    04/13/2010 9:39:53 AM CDT
    Joy says ...
    I just ate some of this pineapple and it's the sweetest pineapple I've ever had. I'll definitely be back to Whole Foods for more....I just wish it wasn't a 45 minute drive.
    04/16/2010 6:18:15 PM CDT
    Kourosh Shahrivar says ...
    This fruit is my drug, Do you believe that Pineapple can kill Tapeworms? As a matter of fact. IT IS. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kp9g8Xsusbw
    04/20/2010 10:21:35 PM CDT
    Joe @ Eden Kitchen says ...
    Sounds great, I wish we could get something similar to 'whole trade' pineapples in New Zealand!
    04/11/2010 2:05:38 PM CDT
    Tony says ...
    I just picked up some fantastic pineapples from the Princeton Whole Foods in New Jersey. They taste amazing! I made some fresh pineapple juice with my Norwalk Juicer. Delicious!
    04/12/2010 9:29:25 AM CDT
    Tyrah says ...
    good info Jane! That's how I pick mine is by smell. We've been eating these WT ones and they are delicious!
    04/13/2010 10:00:23 AM CDT
    LFitz says ...
    Smell is right. When it just starts to smell a little musty and "pineapplely" at the bottom of the pineapple, then it's ready to be cut. And I agree, it takes me 3 minutes to cut up a whole pineapple. Super easy and far more delicious than buying the pre-cut stuff.
    04/13/2010 11:22:57 AM CDT
    Tanya Canada says ...
    Hi! I LOVE pineapples! We have one of those cutters that cuts into one long spiralled slice. It's great! Where do these Whole trade Pineapples come from? I was at Whole Foods in Tampa FL about a month ago and was disappointed that their pineapples where not organic. Are these Whole Trade pineapples organic? The Maui pineapples I've eaten are the very best and very sweetest. Do you know of anyone in Hawaii that has organic Hawaiian pineapples?
    04/13/2010 4:57:27 PM CDT
    Carla Davis says ...
    I'm a pineapple sniffer too, LOL
    04/14/2010 6:08:49 PM CDT
    Stephanie Greenwood says ...
    I'm eating some right now! Great stuff!
    04/14/2010 7:58:06 PM CDT
    Nina says ...
    Fresh pineapple is yummy! If you don't want to peel it you can purchase an inexpensive gadget that drills down and pulls up the entire inside coiled. Don't forget, buying a whole pineapple is not only fresher but cheaper than buying it already cut up.
    04/14/2010 8:20:59 PM CDT
    Lainey says ...
    We love pineapples. Stopping by Whole Foods this weekend to pick up a few. They are great in the Vitamix machine with ice.
    04/14/2010 9:39:46 PM CDT
    Miss Hilary says ...
    Thank you for the info. I do prefer canned pineapple. But, if I ever want to buy a whole one and do everything myself, it is good to know ahead of time of what to expect!
    04/15/2010 12:23:25 AM CDT
    Tamera says ...
    Don't forget to juice the skin and the core!
    04/15/2010 5:57:55 AM CDT
    Marilyn Brudno says ...
    I peel pineapples and blend them, core and all, with a little fruit juice in my Vita-mix. This makes the freshest juice imaginable, and it seems to ease my arthritis pains.
    04/15/2010 8:01:06 AM CDT
    Lloyd Stanley Huddy says ...
    Pineapple has an Intermediate or Medium rating of 66 on the Food Glycemic Index Scale.
    04/15/2010 11:35:34 AM CDT
    C.A. Rerick says ...
    I have a different way to cut pineapple because I don't want to waste any of it. I cut off the bottom and the crown then I start on one end and cut around and around in about one inch strips the pineapple and lose less of the meat and I find it easier to handle. When trimmed from top to bottom it seems to take off more of the rounded out middle and you end up with a slick side so it's hard to handle.
    04/15/2010 2:14:55 PM CDT
    C.A. Rerick says ...
    According to EWG, the following produce has the lowest pesticide load, ranked in order with the produce with the absolute lowest pesticides first. See the website for highest. 1.Onion 2.Avocado 3.Sweet corn (Frozen) 4.PINEAPPLES 5.Mango 6.Asparagus 7.Sweet peas (Frozen) 8.Kiwi 9.Bananas 10.Cabbage 11.Broccoli 12.Papaya 13.Blueberries 14.Cauliflower 15.Winter Squash 16.Watermelon 17.Sweet potatoes 18.Tomatoes 19.Honeydew melon 20.Cantaloupe
    04/15/2010 2:19:18 PM CDT
    hsiaw says ...
    Hi C.A. - there are many benefits to our Whole Trade Pineapples, which you can read about in detail here: http://blog.wholefoodsmarket.com/2010/03/introducing-pineapple-with-a-purpose/ An excerpt regarding the environmental impact of traditional pineapple harvesting: <em>Pineapple is a land and labor-intensive crop and, like many commercial crops, it is farmed intensively. As planted area has increased rapidly, so has concern over the environmental and social impact of this relatively new industry. A few principal complaints have emerged, including: heavy erosion and loss of top soil; contamination of water supplies from runoff of agrochemicals; infestations of insects that are attracted to improperly disposed plant matter; and deforestation in the search for new area to plant. Despite reassurances from the broader industry that production is compliant with local laws and similar in environmental impact to other intensive crops, we see an opportunity to use our purchasing power to support growers who are raising the bar. </em>
    04/15/2010 4:02:37 PM CDT
    Wendy Goodman says ...
    Dear Whole Foods Cherry Creek, I bought 8 Whole Trade pineapples last weekend for a luau in Boulder for my daughter's graduation. When I got to the store the pineapples looked so small, but very fresh. I picked out 8 and each one was delicious! I cut them into quarters, cut under the core, and cut out the fruit in one piece, then sliced. I pushed every other piece to the side creating an outrigger canoe. Left the crown on and decorated with orchids. Each was laid on a 'ti' leaf and used as centerpieces for the tables---beautiful!
    05/15/2010 9:23:34 AM CDT