Whole Story

The Official Whole Foods Market® Blog

 

47 Comments

Comments

Kristin says ...
As a renter, I haven't had much success convincing my curmudgeonly landlord to install energy saving appliances or reduce the frequency with which the lawn maintenence team cuts the grass and uses wasteful leaf blowers instead of rakes. However, I CAN control how I LIVE in the apartment. I've changed all the bulbs to energy savers and made blankets easily accessible so we can warm ourselves without turning on the heaters. I even set up my office in the apartment's dining room to take advantage of the natural light in that room during the day, when I work. In the afternoon I follow the light upstairs where I read, and at night my partner and I snuggle in our bedroom, the smaller of the two in the unit, because the smaller space is more efficient to heat.
10/05/2007 11:41:55 AM CDT
Terri Paulson says ...
I do as much as I can to reduce carbon. I unplug all unnecessary appliances when not in use. I buy locally grown and/or organic produce. I buy locally produced HUMANELY raised meats and dairy products. Raising animals in their natural environment helps the earth by eliminating much of the waste issues associated with factory farming. It also eliminates issues created by chemical fertilizers, pestisides, hormones etc. I believe feeding cows their natural diet of grass may even reduce the amount of gas produced by less fiber rich diets fed to cows raised in feedlots. I've changed out all of my light bulbs to CFLs. I keep used FedEx packs and other large envelopes at my desk at work to gather envelopes and other paper items [calculator tapes etc] to bring home to recycle. I also make scratch note paper out of 8 1/2 x 11 paper by tearing them in 4 parts and keeping the stack on my desk for quick notes. I bring my own bags to stores rather than using their paper or plastic bags. I look for new ideas every day to help save our world for the generations to come. I also talk with my daughter daily about ways we can do out part to save the planet.
10/06/2007 7:30:42 AM CDT
Hilary Marsh says ...
I try to do my weekend errands by bike, and during the week I take the train to work. So there are many weekends that the car never leaves the garage! From June through October, I visit my local farmer's market and get as much of my produce there. Then I go to Whole Foods and do the rest of my grocery shopping. Also, I keep a few canvas bags in my bike panniers and some in the car trunk as well, so I can't forget them!
10/06/2007 12:01:25 PM CDT
Bonnie says ...
There are so many ways we help out....one of the main things we do is look at what we are about to recycle to see if we can use it for arts and crafts or storage. -Glass Jars are saved to store my husbands nuts and bolts. They also make great penny reward jars. -Formula containers and coffee tins are cleaned and reused to make toy drums and learning games (we punch out holes of various size widths in the plastic lid) you take milk caps and decorate them with your favorite character stickers or colored dots. Each milk cap can be popped in the lid to help young tots with muscle hand strength, color matching and learning and counting. -toilet paper rolls and paper towel rolls are saved for making telescopes, flags and other arts and craft projects.
10/07/2007 5:52:20 AM CDT
Richard says ...
We recycle applesauce cups and yogurt cups for spring time growing season. instead of going to the store and buying starter kits we cut out holes in the bottom of the cups and start our seeds in them. we store them in a disposable tin with plastic dome lid that we recycled from a party we had. this serves as the greenhouse.
10/07/2007 5:54:37 AM CDT
Tracy says ...
As an environmental consultant who knows first hand how much stuff ends up in landfills, I understand how it is always important to first Re-duce, then Re-Use, and the final option is Re-cycle. One way to Re-use before Re-cycling is to use your printed cash register receipts - from Whole Foods or anywhere - for shopping lists, to-do lists, or for leaving notes for family or friends. You can even write on the printed side - usually pens are darker than the receipt print. When you can no longer Re-use the receipts, Re-cycle them!
10/08/2007 7:49:06 AM CDT
Armin says ...
I use a Scott's Classic Reel mower for mowing the lawn instead of a gas lawn mower and hedge shears instead of electric or gas hedge trimmers.
10/08/2007 8:54:56 PM CDT
Linda says ...
My husband and I no longer use plastic water bottles. We have lived on our sailboat 6 months out of the year anchored out in the remote islands of the Bahamas. The beaches are filled with the use once and toss plastic water bottles. We have made a commitment to not litter our earth with any more plastic. Also plastic is a petroleum product and if we all used less plastic perhaps our natural resources for could be extended. We are now using th SIGG water bottles. They are made in Switzerland and are made aluminum with a liner to prevent and toxins getting into your drinking water. We love them. Linda
10/09/2007 3:34:46 AM CDT
Rebecca McDonough says ...
There are three major changes we've made to decrease our carbon footprints and environmental impact: 1) My husband and I have taken to walking almost everywhere we can. Many days we never use the car at all, and we're well known now for walking for groceries, haircuts, dinner out, and just about any place we can. We currently have two cars, but are seriously considering selling one, as it's mostly idle anyway. It feels wonderful to be sparing the air (and the lungs of the many asthmatics we know) by walking, and we get to reap the benefits of the exercise as well. We also feel a greater connectedness to the local neighborhoods and cities because we're not just cruising in and out of them, but are a part of them. 2) We've also gone a step back in time and forward in efficiency by putting up a clothes line in an inconspicuous area of our backyard. The clothes are washed in the evening when the demand for power is low (with an efficient front-loading washer and planet-friendly washing supplies), and then hung up in the morning. By afternoon they're clean, crisp and nearly wrinkle-free. 3) Lastly, almost of all our bills are paid and magazine/newspaper subscriptions are read online, greatly reducing the need for paper and the gasoline to deliver it. Now more than ever, we live in a world where seemingly small changes can bring extraordinary results. We are fortunate beyond words for all we have, and all that is within our grasp to do.
10/09/2007 1:37:18 PM CDT
Barbara says ...
Simple as it sounds, we dress for the weather, open windows anytime the breeze keeps the house cool enough, and use our programmable thermostat. That way, our house always feels comfortable for us with minimal use of the heating and air conditioning. And the fresh air is always welcome.
10/09/2007 6:57:06 PM CDT
Debi Pikulski says ...
I've driven a hybrid vehicle for a few years now. The emissions are much lower and I use alot less gas. We are big on recycling, and also purchase whatever recycled items we can find. I also try to compost. Why pay to have them haul away garbage, when it can enrich the soil!
10/10/2007 9:43:26 PM CDT
Natalie Hursky says ...
Packaging: At my local Whole Foods store, I would like to see meat sold in something other than styrofoam and wrapped in plastic. I would buy it wrapped up in newspaper... I just called the local store and requested that. When shopping, I have started bringing my own bags everywhere and refusing to take another single plastic bag home. I have managed to remember to bring food containers to restaurants to take home leftovers.
10/11/2007 11:21:12 AM CDT
Dean Patterson says ...
Use tap water whenever possible. The cost of bottled water production, purification and transportation amounts to approximately one quarter gallon of oil-related hydrocarbon/carbon emissions per gallon of bottled water produced. The taste difference in bottled vs. tap in preparing food (rice, oatmeal, mixed drinks, etc..) is negligible but the environmental impacts are significant.
10/13/2007 10:23:43 AM CDT
Maud Bech says ...
Dear Wholefoods, I commend WF efforts in reducing our carbon footprint. Hereby some food for thought: I am from the Netherlands where everyone brings his own bags to the grocery store. I try to stick to this practice as I shop here at WF in Houston. Today, the bagging clerk thanked me for bringing my own shoppingbasket. A suggestion for Wholefoods to encourage their customers to bring/recycle their shopping bags could be to reward customers with a (for example $ 1) donation in their name to a WholeFoods green cause which aims to reduce the carbon footprint even further. .....I cannot see why introducing this in the US is not possible. It would only be natural that Wholefoods would take the lead in introducing the practice of bring your own bag or sell strong canvas recyclable bags similar to Albert Heijn in the Netherlands.
10/16/2007 12:51:10 PM CDT
Maud Bech says ...
Ask for "no ice" or "half ice" when you order a drink. Imagine the energy involved in cleaning the drinking water and freezing it into ice cubes. Most of the time those ice cubes end up down the drain, unused! Really, from an outsider's perspective, the quanttity of ice used in the US is excessive.
10/16/2007 2:53:46 PM CDT
deanna rogowski says ...
OUR FAMILY WRAPS ALL PRESENTS IN ART WORK THAT MY 5YR OLD TWIN BOYS HAVE DONE AT SCHOOL.THAT WAY-THE PAPER GETS USED AGAIN AND RELATIVES GET BEAUTIFUL DRAWINGS!!!
10/22/2007 2:57:36 PM CDT
Andy says ...
I am a huge Whole Foods fan, but I recently read an article that makes me a little uneasy about the company. Although Whole Foods is a lot "greener" than most other companies, they still have room to improve. Please read. http://www.slate.com/id/2138176/
11/14/2007 12:03:13 PM CST
Leanne says ...
Re: Offsetting carbon usage in your daily life. We attempt to offset the damage by buying offsets for the CO2 that we contribute annually to the atmosphere. First, using www.carboncounter.org, we calculate the # of tons of CO2 that our household emits each yr (factors include house size, utility bills, type of car) donating to an organization). Then, we donate to an organizaton that works to reduce carbon emissions (eg. carbonfund.org, climatetrust.org). We usually donate $12 for every ton. By donating based on how much CO2 we contribute, we become more conscious of what we consume!
01/21/2008 8:08:25 AM CST
Crystal says ...
I buy local and what is in season. Visiting the farmers market, shopping at Whole Foods, and planning my own vegatable garden are some ways to reduce carbon usage. I saw a great idea on "Get Fresh with Sara Snow". She calls it the 100 mile diet. You cook a meal with only ingrediants that came from a hundred mile radius of your home.
01/23/2008 7:25:06 PM CST
Jessie says ...
<strong>Jessie</strong> Ok, I'm not in complete agreement with this, but I see your point. Thanks for sharing.
02/09/2008 3:36:09 AM CST
Gloria says ...
To reduce the amount water run to get a face cloth warm I dampen one and place it in the microwave for 20 seconds. While it heats I apply my cleanser and then remove my makeup with a nice soft warm facecloth and cut down on the amount of water down the drain. And it feels good too.
02/12/2008 11:06:20 AM CST
Karen Simmons says ...
Use cloth grocery bags. I learned that it takes about12 million barrels of oil to produce the 100 billion grocery bags that are used each year. Wow.
02/13/2008 9:16:45 AM CST

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