Whole Story

The Official Whole Foods Market® Blog

 

49 Comments

Comments

Jen says ...
ALSO - my grandfather wore suits to present himself nicely if someone was coming to take his picture. Corn and Soybeans are part of a healthy diet as long as it IS NOT GENETICALLY MODIFIED SOYBEANS. Some of you people full of negative comments should do your homework before posting a comment. Vegetables are a natural way of giving these birds a diet that is well rounded. Soybeans are a natural vegetarian source of protein. As for corn, who doesn't like the sweetness of corn?
11/21/2009 7:56:13 PM CST
Veda Stram says ...
Healthy, clean, dry conditions do not matter when what you do is KILL them at a few months of age. There is no such thing as "clean and healthy" dead baby turkey flesh. GO VEGAN!
11/21/2009 10:04:06 PM CST
Mocha says ...
I am new to the organic and free range market. I love the idea of a turkey not living in cramped conditions. Where is the "free range" you are promoting? Looks like it just means they can migrate 5 feet outside their cages, still crowded. It does not seem humane. Thanks, Mocha
11/22/2009 4:44:28 AM CST
gayle says ...
Free range? hahahahahhahaHA! Why can't they wander all over that beautiful property?
11/22/2009 6:30:09 PM CST
Stephen Collins says ...
Jerr, I also would be disappointed if Whole Foods used a staged photo. Part of me thinks that they actually did. I don't have a problem with the idea that my food needs to be killed for me to eat it, so I don't need to become a vegetarian. What bothers me is how hard it is to find food that hasn't been abused for it's entire (albeit short) life. So, I had to do what I thought Whole Foods would have done. I found a local farm and bought a turkey from them. Taken from the pasture and slaughtered on Friday, and in my refrigerator on Saturday. Like real food should be. Yeah, I had to pay 3.99/lb. but it was worth it to me. I'm surprised Whole Foods doesn't feel there are enough customers to offer this themselves. And there is nothing healthy about corn and soybeans for near any animal in this country. You can't even eat most of the corn in this country because its completely inedible. I wonder how many dead turkeys they pulled out of that cage before they took the photo at the top of the page?
11/22/2009 8:37:24 PM CST
nancy says ...
i bought a fresh free range turkey last week at whole foods with an expiration date of 12/6. Are you positive that this will be OK for Thanksgiving? I have heard that you are not supose to get fresh turkeys but 1 or 2 DAYS before. I am afraid when i open it up, it will be bad!!! HELP nancy
11/23/2009 8:23:21 AM CST
Claudia says ...
I think people tend to do their homework as far as posting goes. Corn and soybeans are among the most genetically modified cereals around; and it is known that too much of these are not good. Corn is in almost everything we eat. Watch King Corn and Food, Inc. Yes, people not too long ago did dress up to present themselves well; and I cannot disagree with this practice. It is much nicer socially than what people do today. My husband's father was a farmer; and I have seen this in his family. My family felt the same way about this custom. If the turkeys have free access to come and go as they please, then it is ideal. But the picture does give the impression that they are, in fact, packed in there; despite the fact that poultry tends to gather together a lot!
11/23/2009 10:41:35 AM CST
Donna says ...
I am a consumer that prefers natural old fashioned farm food. In this day and age, we the people need to educate and apply common sense to what we expect with animals. Remember, they are animals and not people and placing human "feelings & expections" on animals is not to the animals benefit. Humaine & natural living conditions does not mean that they live in a condo with their 10 sq. ft. of space taht this their's and have friends over for dinner & cards. It means that they live in a standard that is natural and appropriate to them with some human intervention at times. What turkeys need in life, as explained by Ed Cifur, Whole Foods Team Member, is exactly correct. It works the same way with chickens, pigs, cows, etc. They all have their own needs and natural way of living and socializing. What's good for the goose (us) is not necessarily good for the gander (the critter). I am fortunate enough to have a working farm within 3 miles of my home even though I live in suburbia. The livestock and poultry they raise is for local and their own use. They are not 100% organic but everthing is free range and raised in the animals natural environment. I am able to ask questions and talk with the farmer to educate myself and then apply common sense. I also remember as a child going to my Aunt and Uncle's farm. They raised turkeys for a while and the turkey's liked to crowd themsleves into the huge barn, even on hot days where the human intervention would come in because the turkeys would stay there and suffocate. Get one or so to go outside and the others would follow. I believe that before we start questioning "humaine" and "natural", perhaps dig a little deeper into the vast resourses we have to truly understand the needs and requirements of the critter.
11/23/2009 10:44:45 AM CST
Jen says ...
Mr. Collins, If they are feed NATURALLY grown corn and soybeans it is healthy for them. Soybeans and corn are the most common of genetically modified foods. I am not referring to these foods. Soybeans and corn (when grown naturally) provide a host of nutrients. A cow cannot eat corn, a chicken or turkey should. It is very frustrating to hear some of these comments, when I grew up on a farm and know what our animals were fed and how they are characteristically. I am glad some of you can afford $3.99/lb for your turkey. It is wonderful that you went tog a local farm. For those of us who cannot afford to pay that much, it is a relief to know that I do not have to sacrifice quality - I can buy one of these turkeys.
11/23/2009 12:17:15 PM CST
Stephen Collins says ...
Jen... You might not be able to convince me that 'naturally' grown corn and soybeans even exist anymore. I would also argue, unfortunately, that while your experiences on your family farm are true, that the farms where we get are food today, are nothing like the farms most of us grew up on and around.
11/23/2009 2:46:28 PM CST
hsiaw says ...
As per USDA guidelines, fresh turkeys should be stored in a refrigerator for up to 1-2 days and in the freezer for up to 12 months. http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/turkey_from_farm_to_table/index.asp
11/23/2009 4:41:06 PM CST
Brunty Farms says ...
You see Whole Foods, people want truly free range, pasture raised products from farmers.... not men in business suits. From the other post it said that "only the tips of beaks are trimmed". If you notice in these turkeys more than half of the upper beak is trimmed. Sad, that this is considered humane even by Whole Foods standards. I welcome you to visit our farm and truly I will show you what free range turkeys should look like. Like I said in the previous post, you guys have a long way to go. You have captured a market that is taking the food industry by storm. People that care about their food have a lot of pull in how it's raised and treated. Any farm that I have seen on your blog so far would not meet my standards, if I was buying a turkey. I get it though, it's tough to find poultry readily available that meets consumers needs. The question is, how do you find a farm to supply Whole Foods that meets these high expectations of your consumers. A turkey with a full beak, that has lived the majority of it's life on grass/pasture, not in a barn nor a dirt yard. Yes, turkeys do flock together, but nice cover up. Those pics show endless bodies of turkeys, I'm dumbfounded that in your routine checks that this hasn't been an issue. See a company of this stature (Whole Foods) can demand to these turkey farms whatever you want. If you say that you don't want any of the birds beaks trimmed and that you want them raised on pasture... guess what.... that's what they are going to do. Do yourself a favor and trail blaze your own standards that poultry companies should abide by... not the other way around. For all you consumers out there that want to know the truth, visit a family farm and ask the farmers the questions yourself.... not Whole Foods. Brunty Farms
11/10/2010 8:11:46 PM CST
eva says ...
I'm not sure if I am getting what I want when I buy this turkey. Whole foods claims that Jaindl turkeys are free range, and humanely raised and slaughtered, and some are fed organic feed; however the Jaindl website does not make any claims to being a free-range or humane. They do not seem to have any certification for these claims. I ordered the bird today, choosing the organic/free range bird; but now I'm not sure if this product is all that it claims. Can anyone at Whole Foods clarify for me?
11/18/2010 4:30:56 PM CST
Kim says ...
I would love to buy a locally raised natural or organic turkey. I checked on prices at several farms in this area and the rates were all $7 to $8 per pound. I understand that the local farmers need to charge these prices to make their profits; but unfortunately, this puts it out of reach for many families, considering the expenses for the rest of an organic Thanksgiving meal.
11/22/2010 6:29:49 AM CST
bepkom says ...
We encourage our customers to get to know the farmers and ranchers who provide the meat they purchase. Here’s a link to Jaindl's website for information: http://www.jaindl.com/Jaindl-Farms/ If you have more questions beyond this, please contact them directly to ensure you get the most accurate information available.
12/10/2010 12:48:12 PM CST
BRU says ...
..R.I.P...YUM,YUM...LMAO...
03/31/2011 7:27:56 AM CDT
Susan says ...
How many days can you hold the fresh turkey in the refrigerator before cooking?
11/14/2011 9:11:31 AM CST
janejohnson says ...
@Susan All of our fresh turkeys should be dated. The turkeys should be cooked or frozen prior to that date.
11/17/2011 12:49:21 PM CST
Donna says ...
Hi I would like to know if your turkeys are corn fed? I am allergic to corn. Thank you
12/26/2011 8:18:28 PM CST
Mary Ann Dimuzio says ...
Are your turkeys fed non-GMO grains? If so, why are the turkeys not labeled organic?
10/15/2014 11:07:38 AM CDT
Nikki - Community Moderator says ...
@MARY ANN - The Jaindl Farm does offer an organic option of turkey which cannot contain any GMOs since it is certified organic. it does not appear that all of their turkey options are organic, however. You can find more product info at http://www.jaindl.com/store/Turkeys/Jaindl-Organic-Turkey-Orgainic-O4I_14.aspx.
10/15/2014 1:26:45 PM CDT
Diane Rodabaugh says ...
Where can I buy my Jaindl this year....called Will's Poultry where I usually get my large bird; are there any other places where I can get them?
11/03/2014 8:16:02 AM CST
Diane Rodabaugh says ...
Where can I buy my turkey....in Buffalo New York area.....get one every year; they are the best.......usually get a 30 pounder......only Jaindl will do....
11/03/2014 8:18:12 AM CST
Angélica - Community Moderator says ...
@DIANE We do not currently have a store in Buffalo so the best suggestion I have would be to contact the store directly. The phone number listed for them on their website is (610) 395-333. Thank you!
11/03/2014 2:27:47 PM CST

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