Whole Story

The Official Whole Foods Market® Blog

 

337 Comments

Comments

Lisa Miller says ...
I buy in bulk, and cook large quanties. Make a big pot of veggi soup, eat it a few days and then freeze the rest in individual containers. That way I have ready made meals on hand.
10/08/2009 7:31:39 PM CDT
SM says ...
I cook lentil stews with fresh dark greens and vegetables which generates a large quantity of nutritious food for a family of four for under $20 a week. I purchase directly from an organic farmer at my farmer's market and from Whole Foods. http://www.nicholsfarm.com/. I find buying meat, package foods and in bulk is costly. I use to buy in bulk and ended up throwing away things that spoiled.
10/08/2009 9:28:39 PM CDT
Kathy says ...
Stock up when the good stuff is on sale. No, you don't need 10 boxes of whole wheat, but when is it ever only $1 a box?!?
10/08/2009 10:08:38 PM CDT
Kathy says ...
Oops, I meant whole wheat PASTA.
10/08/2009 10:09:22 PM CDT
susan freeman says ...
I get the good stuff by taking advantage of Whole Food Sale information and buying bulk items in the quantities that I need instead of buying a larger pre-packaged amount that ends up being thrown away. When I find pre-portioned products that are on sale, I call my friends to see if we can split the item. It usually works out wonderfully and we end up making a dinner party out of it!
10/08/2009 10:16:16 PM CDT
Sans says ...
I look at wholefoods.com first, then I make my shopping list according to the sale items. Some great values every week, 365, madness, truckload, weekly buys, they ALWAYS have the goods you need on sale!
10/08/2009 10:21:50 PM CDT
Maria says ...
I buy a variety of dried beans from the bulk section like black, pinto,garbanzo,lentils,split peas etc. I love bean soup and make my own from garden grown peppers, onions,garlic, parsley,etc. very inexpensive and very nourishing.
10/08/2009 10:38:22 PM CDT
Sue says ...
Question: How to get the most value (output) out of organic food by spending less money (input)? Answer: Select the least expensive food with the most nutritional value. Example: Select varieties of dark leafy greens with the most iron content. Select varieties of lentils high in protein. Conclusion: You'll know the real value of your food if you read the nutritional value labels. The answer to the question was already there on the food itself :)
10/09/2009 12:58:34 AM CDT
Lindsay says ...
I get good stuff for less by eating vegetarian-I have several meals a week with beans or tofu, lentils, rice, pasta, canned tomatoes, frozen vegetables, and fresh produce that's on sale. I make sure to have whole grains, protein and lots of vegetables at every meal, and still spend only $50 a week for meals for both my husband and I. Vegetarian is SO much cheaper than eating meat, and better for the environment. The money I save from not buying meat products I can use to get more organic food.
10/09/2009 9:03:17 AM CDT
Joni says ...
I get good stuff for less by using the sales flier and reading Whole Foods email. Shopping for two, I can focus on quality foods, fresh seasonal produce and healthy flavors. We found some tasty and affordable wines at the Wine & Cheese event. I buy small quantities of special menu ingredients on the bulk aisle - no waste. The Best Stuff for Less is a cup of mango gelatto to top off the shopping experience!
10/09/2009 10:35:38 AM CDT
Sarah Jelmeland says ...
I love buying organic and local. Since farmer's markets started in May I have been buying local produce from them. I then take the produce and either eat it right away or I can or freeze it depending on the produce. When I am cutting up veggies I take the ends that we don't want to eat freeze them and then make my own vegetable stock out of it once I have amassed enough veggies or when I need it to make soup. In the stores for meat products I like to buy a roast and then eat that for a dinner then use the left overs for making sandwiches or another meal. Ground meat is great for this. Make a southern style meatloaf for dinner one night then crumble the remains the following night for burritos or tacos.
10/09/2009 11:01:33 AM CDT
Katie says ...
Cook as much as possible from scratch. Make soups in large quantities, and freeze them for later use rather than buying canned soups or prepacked meals/foods. Make your own whole grain breads (tortillas, rolls, pizza crusts), fruit bars, granola bars, etc. Make and freeze these foods in bulk ahead of time. Also purchase berries and such at times when they are in season, then freeze for use later during the months when they are more expensive. Making as much as possible from scratch can save you a ton over buying packaged convenience foods.
10/09/2009 3:56:16 PM CDT
Amy says ...
I but veggies on sale and usually turn them into soup over the weekend - all kinds! Then, I use individual serving containers and freeze portions so they are ready to go during the week for work! Healthy lunch, and VERY inexpensive! My favorites involve roasted veggies - roasting really helps develop the flavors and adds a lot of depth!
10/09/2009 6:47:17 PM CDT
Zanetha says ...
I absolutely live in the bulk section. This is where I find higher quality grains, legumes, nuts, herbs and spices than their packaged counterparts for a fraction of the price. Knowing where my food comes from and cooking it myself is good for my family and good for my pocketbook. I keep an eye on sale and seasonal items, too. Seasonal produce is more delicious, sustainable and often cheaper than non-seasonal goods. I never go to the grocery store hungry and I also generally plan my family's meals. I do allow for occasional 'splurgy' items, especially if it's a healthy item. Organic hemp oil, supergreens, and Weleda face products may seem expensive, but the health and vitality they add to my well being is priceless...and I'm worth it!
10/09/2009 7:30:41 PM CDT
Carolyn says ...
We save money by taking time to shop for sales.. and this means shopping without our 4 kids in tow! I comparative shop at several stores, and pick up what is on sale at Whole Foods and store it for future use (dry goods). My boys are GFCF so I make the expensive convenience items from scratch (nuggets, etc) and purchase a few unique items at WF. There are always a few items that are a really good deal, and I try to check for the coupons in KIWI magazine.
10/09/2009 7:49:26 PM CDT
Megan says ...
I try to buy in bulk things I'm sure to use, I also look for store brands and for fruits and vegetables I buy mostly in season things from a local farmer's market or co-op. I also try to decide what to buy ahead of time. I can't afford to buy all organic so I'll try to get things I'm sure to use all of or what's on sale.
10/09/2009 10:36:09 PM CDT
Rebecca says ...
We have bought the 365 brands for years. As our children have grown up on the food, they are much healthier and stronger as young adults. The extra cost, if there really is one after all the additives and preservatives are missing, is well worth it to see the glow of health in your children's faces. Just think how much fast food restaurants would have cost with 5 children. We appreciate Whole Foods and are thankful for years of shopping!
10/10/2009 7:11:28 AM CDT
Glenda says ...
I find the best way to shop organic is to only buy 2-3 cuts of meat/fish a week. Buy larger quanities from items on sale that week. I divide and freeze or just referate depending on the item. Next I buy similar fruits/vegies/sauces that are good for all cuts. The real key is to make a menu of all meals. This way you can combine what you have bought and ONLY buy what you need. I do shop a couple organic stores depending on what I need and keep a price list of everyday items like canned/frozen/bottled items. I am able to buy 90% organic.
10/10/2009 11:43:39 AM CDT
Abbie says ...
I buy my beans in crate amounts, then I get a 10 percent discount!
10/10/2009 11:52:38 AM CDT
Amber Bayer says ...
I believe a little planning goes hand in hand with saving money and ensuring what you get is going to be organic and wholesome. Eating in season is another winner for budget and health.
10/11/2009 8:20:18 PM CDT
Julie says ...
Our children suffer from food allergies and sensitivities and must take lunch and snacks to school and out anytime we leave the house. I portion out any purchased snacks myself rather than paying for preportioned packages. I can prep snacks for the week using waxed bags and stickers in under thirty minutes and save almost forty percent. I also buy 100% juice in the larger size, and fill reusable drink containers (or reused water bottles) 2/3 of the way full and freeze them for school lunches. The kids have cold juice at lunch for less than juice boxes, and we haven't added quite as much to the landfill.
10/11/2009 8:24:41 PM CDT
April E says ...
I agree that Bulk items will definately save you money and go longer. I also get the goods for less by, sticking to my list and buying exactely what I need. When you have all of the menus planned for the week it is simple and quick to know exactely what you need and it saves alot of money. And of course don't forget to check the sales flier before you shop!
10/11/2009 11:35:33 PM CDT
Lori Bolden says ...
I know it cost a little more to shop at Whole Foods Market, but I am saving on medical expenses. By eating fresh and organic, I see fewer illnesses and/or I am not fatigued from eating packaged foods that are loaded with additives and preservatives. I had rather pay to have fresh, organic and/or natural products than to have buy foods and goods that lack in nutritional value because they have traveled so far or have been sitting on around way too long. My budget is to pay little or nothing for medical costs and pay for the substinence and my products my body need and yearn for...fresh fruits and vegetables.....uuuuummmm.
10/12/2009 11:42:02 AM CDT
Latasha Sandoval says ...
First of all, educate myself on what the "good stuff" is and purpose in my heart to purchase the good stuff to the best of my families financial ability. From there, I look for low-cost seasonal foods that will couple as both delicious nutrition and good for you body medicine. This many times will mean time and energy with food companies my family enjoys, requesting coupons, joining email list,saving sales ads, joining coupon clubs and finally stocking up when prices are really low.
10/12/2009 4:37:03 PM CDT
Tiffany Ryan says ...
I review the weekly and monthly specials and make a monthly meal plan accordingly and put it on my calender. Creating a meal plan really cuts back on purchasing more than I need. Plus it makes dinnertime hassle-free since I don't have to think about what to make, I just look at my meal plan. That helps a lot, especially with little ones in the house. I also make a lot of breads and baked goods from scratch. (It is a great activity with the kids, too). That also helps out in saving.
10/13/2009 11:06:41 AM CDT

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