Whole Story

The Official Whole Foods Market® Blog

 

337 Comments

Comments

Niki says ...
Well, we are newlyweds on a tight budget - but we have learned better than to sacrifice the quality of our health by eating conventional meat and other cheap food. Because the people who work at Whole Foods actually know what they're doing, we are able to get organic, grass-fed meat, dairy and eggs - and make it stretch! We buy organic when it makes the most difference - the animal products, thin-skinned produce, and grains - and work to stretch those items with less expensive whole foods. I love cooking and my husband says that I'm the best! We would be so blessed to have a $50 gift card. It would feed us so well! Thanks for this great opportunity. With a recession, you have to decide where your priorities lie - seeing the local Whole Foods just as crowded as always inspires me that we're not giving up the quality of our health for the sake of money or convenience.
10/08/2009 6:37:20 PM CDT
Sue says ...
Question: How to get the most value (output) out of organic food by spending less money (input)? Answer: Select the least expensive food with the most nutritional value. Example: Select varieties of dark leafy greens with the most iron content. Select varieties of lentils high in protein. Conclusion: You'll know the real value of your food if you read the nutritional value labels. The answer to the question was already there on the food itself :)
10/09/2009 12:58:34 AM CDT
Lindsay says ...
I get good stuff for less by eating vegetarian-I have several meals a week with beans or tofu, lentils, rice, pasta, canned tomatoes, frozen vegetables, and fresh produce that's on sale. I make sure to have whole grains, protein and lots of vegetables at every meal, and still spend only $50 a week for meals for both my husband and I. Vegetarian is SO much cheaper than eating meat, and better for the environment. The money I save from not buying meat products I can use to get more organic food.
10/09/2009 9:03:17 AM CDT
Joni says ...
I get good stuff for less by using the sales flier and reading Whole Foods email. Shopping for two, I can focus on quality foods, fresh seasonal produce and healthy flavors. We found some tasty and affordable wines at the Wine & Cheese event. I buy small quantities of special menu ingredients on the bulk aisle - no waste. The Best Stuff for Less is a cup of mango gelatto to top off the shopping experience!
10/09/2009 10:35:38 AM CDT
Katie says ...
Cook as much as possible from scratch. Make soups in large quantities, and freeze them for later use rather than buying canned soups or prepacked meals/foods. Make your own whole grain breads (tortillas, rolls, pizza crusts), fruit bars, granola bars, etc. Make and freeze these foods in bulk ahead of time. Also purchase berries and such at times when they are in season, then freeze for use later during the months when they are more expensive. Making as much as possible from scratch can save you a ton over buying packaged convenience foods.
10/09/2009 3:56:16 PM CDT
Amy says ...
I but veggies on sale and usually turn them into soup over the weekend - all kinds! Then, I use individual serving containers and freeze portions so they are ready to go during the week for work! Healthy lunch, and VERY inexpensive! My favorites involve roasted veggies - roasting really helps develop the flavors and adds a lot of depth!
10/09/2009 6:47:17 PM CDT
Zanetha says ...
I absolutely live in the bulk section. This is where I find higher quality grains, legumes, nuts, herbs and spices than their packaged counterparts for a fraction of the price. Knowing where my food comes from and cooking it myself is good for my family and good for my pocketbook. I keep an eye on sale and seasonal items, too. Seasonal produce is more delicious, sustainable and often cheaper than non-seasonal goods. I never go to the grocery store hungry and I also generally plan my family's meals. I do allow for occasional 'splurgy' items, especially if it's a healthy item. Organic hemp oil, supergreens, and Weleda face products may seem expensive, but the health and vitality they add to my well being is priceless...and I'm worth it!
10/09/2009 7:30:41 PM CDT
Carolyn says ...
We save money by taking time to shop for sales.. and this means shopping without our 4 kids in tow! I comparative shop at several stores, and pick up what is on sale at Whole Foods and store it for future use (dry goods). My boys are GFCF so I make the expensive convenience items from scratch (nuggets, etc) and purchase a few unique items at WF. There are always a few items that are a really good deal, and I try to check for the coupons in KIWI magazine.
10/09/2009 7:49:26 PM CDT
Megan says ...
I try to buy in bulk things I'm sure to use, I also look for store brands and for fruits and vegetables I buy mostly in season things from a local farmer's market or co-op. I also try to decide what to buy ahead of time. I can't afford to buy all organic so I'll try to get things I'm sure to use all of or what's on sale.
10/09/2009 10:36:09 PM CDT
Abbie says ...
I buy my beans in crate amounts, then I get a 10 percent discount!
10/10/2009 11:52:38 AM CDT
Rebecca says ...
We have bought the 365 brands for years. As our children have grown up on the food, they are much healthier and stronger as young adults. The extra cost, if there really is one after all the additives and preservatives are missing, is well worth it to see the glow of health in your children's faces. Just think how much fast food restaurants would have cost with 5 children. We appreciate Whole Foods and are thankful for years of shopping!
10/10/2009 7:11:28 AM CDT
Glenda says ...
I find the best way to shop organic is to only buy 2-3 cuts of meat/fish a week. Buy larger quanities from items on sale that week. I divide and freeze or just referate depending on the item. Next I buy similar fruits/vegies/sauces that are good for all cuts. The real key is to make a menu of all meals. This way you can combine what you have bought and ONLY buy what you need. I do shop a couple organic stores depending on what I need and keep a price list of everyday items like canned/frozen/bottled items. I am able to buy 90% organic.
10/10/2009 11:43:39 AM CDT
Latasha Sandoval says ...
First of all, educate myself on what the "good stuff" is and purpose in my heart to purchase the good stuff to the best of my families financial ability. From there, I look for low-cost seasonal foods that will couple as both delicious nutrition and good for you body medicine. This many times will mean time and energy with food companies my family enjoys, requesting coupons, joining email list,saving sales ads, joining coupon clubs and finally stocking up when prices are really low.
10/12/2009 4:37:03 PM CDT
Lisette Ramos says ...
Hi! I do not shop without coupons and a canvas bag. The coupons for savings and the canvas bag to get some cents off but more importantly not to waste. The coupons I get mostly online from searching mom blogs and the manufacteur or store.
12/18/2009 9:34:31 PM CST
Tiffany Ryan says ...
I review the weekly and monthly specials and make a monthly meal plan accordingly and put it on my calender. Creating a meal plan really cuts back on purchasing more than I need. Plus it makes dinnertime hassle-free since I don't have to think about what to make, I just look at my meal plan. That helps a lot, especially with little ones in the house. I also make a lot of breads and baked goods from scratch. (It is a great activity with the kids, too). That also helps out in saving.
10/13/2009 11:06:41 AM CDT
Emilie says ...
I am so blessed to live in an abundant food shed! Buying seasonal, local products is saving me lots of money in the long run. Buying sustainably uses less energy and eating yummy food keeps our hearts healthy and happy.
10/15/2009 9:36:02 AM CDT
Lauren says ...
I try to get the good stuff by basing my weekly meal plan on what is on sale in the circular. This is not only a great way to feel like you're splurging at a good price, but also a great way to try new varieties of things (ex. a new kind of apple or lettuce or even a grain or rice). Like Madeline, I try to buy in bulk or stock up on things when they're on sale (soups and frozen or freezable things).
10/07/2009 11:58:05 AM CDT
Ben says ...
Buy seasonal produce, buy in bulk, and buy the store brand. Your health is worth the investment.
10/07/2009 11:58:17 AM CDT
Liana says ...
I shop sales, buy store brands (Helllllloooo 365 Everyday Value products!), buy in bulk when possible, buy dried instead of canned (ex: dry beans are usually less expensive than canned beans), and in general shop at Whole Foods! Oh, and make a meal plan for the week & stick to it -- that really helps, too!
10/07/2009 11:58:50 AM CDT
Ashley says ...
I get the good stuff for less by pre-planning my weekly meals and shopping with a list. This way I can avoid the "impulse buys" that tend to rack up the total bill and I can make sure that less food will go to waste! Sounds simple but it works!
10/07/2009 11:59:19 AM CDT
Pamela says ...
I agree. I buy a lot of bulk - rice, flour, nuts, and beans. At this time of the year, beans become a staple at my house as I cook up a big pot for use in veggie chili, beans and greens, and other soups and stews. I can cook a big pot of beans, freeze some and use some immediately. Good stuff!
10/07/2009 11:59:53 AM CDT
Jill says ...
Shop the edges of the store and compare prices and the ingredients (store brand vs. name brand). Plus, bring your own bags to Whole Foods and get credit for every bag used.
10/07/2009 11:59:59 AM CDT
Rachel Patneaude says ...
I am very budget conscious because I make very little money. I go to the store with a few meals in mind and I buy a small amount of organic produce along with some organic rice and sometimes a package of chicken and then I figure out 3 meals with the items I bought. It could be a spinach, red pepper, onion chicken salad one day...Chicken onion and spinach sauted over rice the next and the last day taking last nights leftovers and adding red pepper cracking an egg in it, adding some soy and making it into fried rice. I think that if you plan your meals before you buy the food for them then you can stretch your dollar and spend less overall on better food.
10/07/2009 12:00:01 PM CDT
Leigh Ann says ...
I have found that buying frozen (instead of fresh) organic chicken ($4 or less per pound) saves a lot of money. Also, getting my organic veggies frozen (especially asparagus) doesn't take away from the quality, but saves a bundle and it doesn't rot! Eggs (in the shell) are much cheaper than already separated egg whites, so I do the work myself so I can afford organic. Lastly, I puree and refrigerate frozen organic fruits to add to yogurt and oatmeal- the latter two items I buy in giant containers to lower the price point. Happy shopping!
10/07/2009 12:00:07 PM CDT
Paisley Hillegeist says ...
I stretch my grocery money by not buying processed foods. I make my own sauces, soups, breads, yogurt, cheeses, etc. By doing more of the cooking, I save lots of money and can spend that savings on high quality meats, raw milk, and organic locally grown fruits and vegetables. Sally Fallon's cookbook/manifesto "Nourishing Traditions" is a huge resource for being able to make your own. . . anything! I get my kids in the act, too. We home school, and as part of school we learn about nutrition, math and science by shopping, cooking and eating together.
10/07/2009 12:00:32 PM CDT

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