Whole Story

The Official Whole Foods Market® Blog

 

337 Comments

Comments

Robin OSullivan says ...
I've become more creative with recipes that incorporate inexpensive ingredients, like dried beans and lentils. By adding interesting spices and sauces, I can feed our family for less without making meals seem boring!
10/07/2009 2:49:06 PM CDT
Sheridan Phillips says ...
I really appreciate the specials in the circular and the coupons in the zine! That's where I begin my shopping list...and my list has shifted noticeably. On it goes only what is absolutely essential, must buys to get through the week and replacement of organic bulk items. I might have a few notes on possibles - friends may come for drinks...what is fresh/interesting/shelf stable that could make an instant party? 365 goat cheese is a staple as are 365 Entertainment crackers. Often, there is a wine special to consider. Then, with the basics taken care of, WholeFoods has more than enough temptation to make for a week of great eating - a splurge on crab cakes or lamb chops; 365 organic quinoa with black beans or the brown rice with sardines Portuguese-style make great budget meals; organic spinach added to organic soup or eggs is quick. I enjoy a return to the produce dept. to select a fruit or two - the organic figs are a favorite - and to decide on a bouquet or a few stems for the table. Buying closely for a week rather than shopping for a month means a lower bill and more enjoyable meals. And it all fits into my two bags.
10/07/2009 2:50:10 PM CDT
William says ...
In budget shopping without sacrificing food quality, I consider the following about each product. - Cost per serving and serving size - Anticipated consumption time vs. expiration date - Versatility - Specific quality components sacrificed with price reduction - Alternatives With this system, I tend to remain satisfied with each grocery shopping experience in all respects.
10/07/2009 2:51:43 PM CDT
Charles C. says ...
Certified organic just means that the company has paid to certify that they meet a minimum standard. We love going to the Farmers Market and finding local produce. Its fresh, it supports local economy, it has a small environmental footprint AND you can establish a relationship with the farmers, which allows you to get a better feel for what you are buying.
10/07/2009 2:59:21 PM CDT
Aaron Hines says ...
I get the good stuff for less by purchasing discounted fresh bagged veggies like carrots and snap peas. In particular, when the vegetables are close to their "use by" date the store often marks the products down in price. Nothing is wrong with those vegetables. I can eat them that day or the next while helping the store deplete their inventory. It prevents waste and saves money!
10/07/2009 3:03:29 PM CDT
Gal Witmer says ...
We make the most of our budget by purchasing mostly whole foods, very little in a can, jar or box. Bulk as well does make a big difference. We also buy what is in season and most available at that time. It is usually what is on sale. I have been surprised how well you can feed your family and stick to my eco-principles and be very budget minded.
10/07/2009 3:05:08 PM CDT
Ruby says ...
1. Look for the best that you can buy for the least amount of money. For us that could be a less that top cut of meat but it is organic and can be worked onto one of my meals that we love. 2. Items that you use allot, buy by the case if you can. You can get a better price for it and in the long run save you lots of time and money.
10/07/2009 3:07:45 PM CDT
Jenny Schmidt says ...
I like to stock up when I find a good sale. Pairing a sale with in-store or online coupons can net a GREAT deal!
10/07/2009 3:08:57 PM CDT
Jessica says ...
I shop the farmers market as long as I can in the season. I buy tomatoes, squash, apples, pumpkin, peppers and can or freeze them. This way I don't have to buy it in the store and I have it on hand all the time. When I do buy at the store, I go for bulk food bins and when things are on sale. When it comes to perishables like fruit, I buy what I know I'll eat in a week so I only have to go to the store once a week, which saves gas too.
10/07/2009 3:09:21 PM CDT
Ashley says ...
The best saving advice for parents: I began making our 6-month olds' food. He loves sweet potatoes and squash - and I saw the value of making my own the first time I went shopping. One sweet potato that cost us less than $1.50 made 7-servings, which would buy only 3-jars of the organic! I can make large batches of food and freeze them in ice cube trays buying veggies and fruits when they are in season and on sale. I feel good giving him the best possible first foods knowing exactly what he's eating as well as saving money for our new family.
10/07/2009 3:11:37 PM CDT
Heather says ...
I try to multipurpose meals. I'll roast a chicken one night and then use the leftovers to make enchiladas the next. Or I'll reduce the amount of ground beef I put in a pasta dish so that I can still have protein, but not spend as much.
10/07/2009 3:15:27 PM CDT
Ester says ...
I try very hard to get the best deal for my dollar. This includes couponing (and signing up for coupons like Mambo Sprouts to be sent straight to my house) and checking in-store for coupons. I eat only kosher food, and like to cook from scratch when possible. I buy the fresh produce that's in season, and when I can get "the best price of the year" I buy lots and cook ahead and freeze for later. This way, I always have soups on hand and kugels, quiches, even lasagna! If I'm not using a coupon, I buy the store brand, which is really excellent quality, and quite affordable. I also rely on frozen veggies when I need something that is out of season. the 365 organic frozen veggies are really affordable. Just what happened to the frozen organic mushrooms I used to buy? They were perfect for soups and quiches and now I can't find them!
10/07/2009 3:18:02 PM CDT
Alicia Webster says ...
There are lots of things that you can do to save $$ and still eat high-quality food, but here are a couple...If you know that there are specific brands that you always buy (such as Amy's, Annie's, Maranatha, etc) then go to their websites, and make sure sure that you are signed up to receive their E-mails. There are many companies that are willing to send you coupons and/or free samples, but they need to know that you exist. Fan them on Facebook and follow them on Twitter as well. Also, make sure that you go through your coupons once a week (I look through mine the night before I go grocery shopping, while I am making my list)and try to match the coupons that you have with the sales flyers from the stores at which you shop. Combining coupons with store sales = double the savings.
10/07/2009 3:19:05 PM CDT
Helen Blumenthal says ...
Buy bulk. Find the Whole Foods market that carries items in bulk. The two closest to me are the new Westside store and the Edgewater store.
10/07/2009 3:21:22 PM CDT
Kristen says ...
I save $$ and have a wonderful, healthy breakfast by making my own meusli. I combine organic rolled oats bought in bulk, chopped organic almonds bought in bulk, ground flax seed, organic raisins bought in bulk, grated fresh organic Braeburn apples and yogurt homemade in my machine. To obtain the wonderful thick consistency of whole milk Greek yogurt without the fat, I make my yogurt with 2% milk, a cup of low-fat yogurt and 6 tablespoons of dried no-fat milk. What a great start to the day!
10/07/2009 3:21:53 PM CDT
Cynthia says ...
I get the good stuff for less by shopping the Farmers Market later in the day when the organic vendors are eager to unload. I also get free organic fruit and vegetables from my in-laws' garden, otherwise, all those tomatoes and peppers get composted.
10/07/2009 3:23:56 PM CDT
Becky says ...
I buy store brands, bulk items, NO meat products (which works 'cause we're vegans) and TONS of in season fruit & veggies. I also look for deals on frozen items that I might have coupons for!
10/07/2009 3:25:52 PM CDT
Tarah says ...
I live nearly three hours from the nearest Whole foods so saving money is important. I buy frozen fruits and vegetables, watch for sells, plan ahead, and concentrate on keeping staples and not just easy items. I figure how much I need for a month and buy what I need. When I find a sale on items we use I stock up, I keep an extra freezer to keep the extra items. My son has aspergers syndrome a form of autism and requires a gluten free/cassein free diet free of artificial colors and flavors. So it is important that I make sure I have enough good stuff for him in order to avoid any chance of him getting items that are negative. We plan ahead for our monthly trips to Whole foods.
10/07/2009 3:26:17 PM CDT
teri mitchell says ...
love everything and everyone @ whole foods.
10/07/2009 3:26:42 PM CDT
Andy and Cheryl Anderson says ...
We buy in bulk. We also buy food in the discount area where food is on clearance... There you can get good food still usable, but the can has a dent or lost a label... Bananas in the discount bin because of being old, we dry for banana chips..
10/07/2009 3:26:47 PM CDT
Gina says ...
Take a Chicken to Dinner, Thrice Take one whole beautiful organic chicken. Clean it and sprinkle with salt. Set aside. In a saucepan or the microwave melt 2 oz of natural sweet butter, fresh minced garlic (2 cloves) or a T of garlic powder, a T of sweet paprika, and a sprinkle of fresh ground pepper. Place on a rack in a roasting pan with 1/2 of white wine and 1/2 cup of water in the bottom of the pan. Roast at 450 for 20 minutes, then lower to 350 and cook until the thigh meat is 180. Serve with the unbelievable gravy you just made. Enjoy. The next day, use the leftover meat for chicken salad. Keep the carcass. The next day, throw the carcass and any leftover meat in a pot with water to cover. Add two carrots, one parsnip, two stalks of celery and any of that leftover gravy. Cook for a few hours until you have the most amazing soup. Add noodles, rice, or matzo balls. Congratulate yourself on getting multiple meals from one little chicken.
10/07/2009 3:30:59 PM CDT
Catherine Si says ...
For organic produce, I try to buy what's in season and on sale. That way, I'm usually guaranteed a relatively low price. Otherwise for other organic items like milk and cereal, I try to buy the larger sized items as they are usually cheaper per ounce (more bang for your buck!).
10/07/2009 3:35:06 PM CDT
Katy says ...
There are so many ways to eat healthy and save. When shopping at my local Whole Foods Market I always take advantage of what's on sale during the week, stock up on sale products I'm already familiar with and let myself try out new items at less risk if I don't end up liking it (but that hardly ever happens!) And as busy as we all are, I try to buy produce whole and prep it myself. Sure the prepackaged and already chopped stuff will save you a few minutes, but it'll cost you way more in the long run. Practice your knife skills you won't mind doing the extra prep work! It's also helpful to notice the price per pound/gallon/etc. number usually located to the right of the number for whatever individual item you are purchasing. This is the fool proof way to know whether or not you are getting more for your money or not without messy calculations and comparing box/carton sizes. I also think the best way to not waste money by not using things you buy is create a meal plan. If you are buying something and you don't know why, you might not end up using it before it does bad and that will be money in the garbage!
10/07/2009 3:37:47 PM CDT
sunny says ...
I buy non processed vegan food that are healthy yet tasty. I hardly get sick, not even a cold for over 5 years. Eventually I save over hundreds of dollars on medical bill not just grocery bills. I love to shop at Whole Foods cause I know they carefully look at the ingrediants for me. It's so hard to shop at the "normal" grocery store. Wish all stores stock healthy items like Whole Foods. If Whole Foods is at every city, they can have better buying power which means lower price. The produce section is a like a paradise place to go. I hope some day the prices will be the same as conventional produce. I think it can if everyone makes organic foods "normal" food which what it was over 70 years ago. Ok everyone let your dollars do the talking, but the good foods so the junk foods will go away.... for everyone's sake.
10/07/2009 3:38:05 PM CDT
Claire says ...
I always shop based on what's on sale and plan out my menu for the week (for breakfast, lunch, and dinner). We try to eat vegetarian dinners 3-4 times a week for both health reasons and to save on money. Non-meat proteins are so much cheaper than meat! I also try and make things a couple times a month that can be made into multiple dinners--like a big pot of tomato sauce can be enough for three different meals. A whole chicken will give us two dinners, and I can make stock with the carcass.
10/07/2009 3:38:09 PM CDT

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