Win6 for Concious Capitalism

By Kate Lowery, January 13, 2013  |  Meet the Blogger  |  More Posts by Kate Lowery

John Mackey, along with co-author Raj Sisodia, business professor and co-founder of the Conscious Capitalism Institute, lays out a bold blueprint for capitalism in their fresh, new book: “Conscious Capitalism: Liberating the Heroic Spirit of Business.”

In Conscious Capitalism, John and Raj show that reinventing capitalism to “conscious capitalism” is an extraordinarily powerful system of value creation mutually benefitting all stakeholders involved. It is a common mindset that there are winners and losers in life like in sports, elections, ratings, etc., but the co-authors point out that business is not a zero sum game; it is actually the ultimate positive sum game when businesses operate with higher purpose beyond profits and create value for all involved. They like to call it “Win6” and John explains it well here:

Let Conscious Capitalism inspire you to Win6. Want to know more? Find lots of details in our pressroom and at academyforconsciousleadership.com or at consciouscapitalism.org.

 

2 Comments

Comments

Michael Brown says ...
I am a Whole Foods stockholder and shopper. In response to the question by Steve Inskeep of NPR about whether you still think the Obama health care overhaul is a form of socialism, you responded: "Technically speaking, it's more like fascism. Socialism is where the government owns the means of production. In fascism, the government doesn't own the means of production, but they do control it — and that's what's happening with our health care programs and these reforms." Using "fascism: so cavalierly doesn't add to your credibility to write about political and economic issues. It is pretty shocking to use a word with implications of authoritarianism, extreme nationalism, racism, and anti-Semitism. You do groceries well and as far as I can see are a good employer. Like it or not, the health care law was passed by an elected legislature. Like the approach or not, the intent is to increase access to good health care and control costs. This is not fascism by any stretch of the imagination. Try structuring your criticism without the use of inflammatory and inaccurate terminology. Avoid labels that shut down dialog.
01/16/2013 9:02:22 AM CST
Margaret Kaluzny says ...
I could not agree more with the comment of Michael Borwn quoted below! "Using "fascism: so cavalierly doesn't add to your credibility to write about political and economic issues. It is pretty shocking to use a word with implications of authoritarianism, extreme nationalism, racism, and anti-Semitism. You do groceries well and as far as I can see are a good employer. Like it or not, the health care law was passed by an elected legislature. Like the approach or not, the intent is to increase access to good health care and control costs. This is not fascism by any stretch of the imagination. Try structuring your criticism without the use of inflammatory and inaccurate terminology. Avoid labels that shut down dialog. " I am a long time customer at Whole Foods dating back to the very first store on Lamar in Austin, but John Mackey's comments will send me to the excellent alternatives to shopping at Whole Foods.
01/17/2013 10:05:32 AM CST