Beef Stir-Fry with Bell Peppers, Carrots and Snow Peas

Beef Stir-Fry with Bell Peppers, Carrots and Snow Peas

Serves 4
Top sirloin steak is one of the leanest cuts of beef available. Keep the meat tender and juicy with this quick-cooking stir-fry packed with veggies and a flavorful marinade. Make sure to slice the steak against the grain to prevent chewiness. To save time, use frozen brown rice instead of cooking rice from scratch.
Ingredients: 
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium tamari
  • 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3/4 pound top sirloin steak, thinly sliced against the grain
  • 1/2 cup sliced shallots (from about 2 shallots)
  • 2 red bell peppers, thinly sliced
  • 4 carrots, thinly sliced
  • 8 ounces snow peas, strings removed
  • 3 cups cooked brown rice
  • 1/4 cup chopped toasted cashews
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Method: 
Combine vinegar, tamari, ginger and garlic in a medium bowl. Toss sliced beef in mixture and marinate in the refrigerator for 30 minutes.

After beef has marinated, heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add beef and marinade and cook until beef is just done to your liking, about 5 minutes. Remove beef and juices to a bowl, cover and keep warm. Add ½ cup water to the skillet, bring to a simmer, add shallots and cook 3 minutes or until tender. Stir in bell peppers and carrots. Reduce heat to medium and cover. Cook until vegetables are just fork tender, 7 to 8 minutes, stirring once. Uncover and increase heat to medium-high. Add snow peas and cook 2 minutes longer. Return beef and any juices to skillet and cook 1 minute longer to heat everything thoroughly. Serve with cooked brown rice and garnish with cashews.
Nutritional Info: 
Per Serving: 380 calories (100 from fat), 11g total fat, 3g saturated fat, 40mg cholesterol, 280mg sodium, 44g carbohydrates, (7 g dietary fiber, 9g sugar), 22g protein.
Special Diets: 

Note: We've provided special diet and nutritional information for educational purposes. But remember — we're cooks, not doctors! You should follow the advice of your health-care provider. And since product formulations change, check product labels for the most recent ingredient information. See our Terms of Service.

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