Whole Story

The Official Whole Foods Market® Blog

Enright Park Community Garden

By Kate Medley, September 21, 2010  |  Meet the Blogger  |  More Posts by Kate Medley
We broke ground on the Enright Park Community Garden in the East Liberty neighborhood of Pittsburgh in July 2008. In partnership with the surrounding neighbors, the Kentucky Avenue School, and East Liberty Development, Inc, we worked together to transition an overgrown and abandoned corner lot into a thriving field of cucumbers, zucchini, raspberries, tomatoes and more. The space is now surrounded by rail fencing and bordered by its namesake, Enright Park. Located just three blocks down the street, our Pittsburgh Whole Foods Market commits a part-time garden team member to help with daily maintenance of the space. Countless others of our team members volunteer hand-in-hand with neighbors and school children to weed, water and harvest. When amazing people work together for the good of the community, great things happen. Our garden is proof! The Pittsburgh garden was the first of its kind in our Mid-Atlantic Region and was the inspiration for other gardens being put into food production at schools, group homes, assisted living facilities and other community spaces. All of these garden projects have evolved into a new non-profit foundation called “Whole Grown,” whose focus is to teach people how to grow, prepare, preserve and celebrate food from their own gardens.

 

8 Comments

Comments

Jeanne says ...
WOW! Could a Whole Foods Community Garden possibly be started near the Pasadena, CA Southern California Arroyo Parkway MEGA Whole Foods storefront? I for one would be willing to donate time and help with grassroots promotion and labor to cultivate this effort and make it a reality. I live locally about 8 miles east of the Arroyo Pkwy. store in a small neighboring city, Temple City. Please contact me to discuss getting this effort underway.
10/01/2010 10:58:00 AM CDT
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08/22/2011 2:57:34 PM CDT
Brandi says ...
Loved the video. That is an awesome program you have. We live in a rural area however we still have many families who do not know how to plant and grow a garden. We are working locally with our schools to install outdoor classrooms and community gardens. Great job Whole Foods and all of you who work so hard.
08/24/2011 2:14:25 PM CDT
Mihku Paul says ...
Once again, I hear not one word mentioned about TESTING the soil for lead and contaminants before growing food crops. Lots of people are looking at this site and it is a great opportunity to get the word out. Too many folks start growing and consuming food from bad soil. The sad fact is that they would have no idea that they are consuming toxic elements most of the time, while the toxins do their nasty work on the body (most often) silently. PLease encourage your project staff to include a few words about the necessity of testing soil before growing and consuming crops. An "organically" grown tomato isn't worth much if it also contains metals and/or chemical toxins.
10/23/2011 12:45:53 PM CDT
Adrianne Chandlr says ...
I am working on a school project about ways communities are using creative innovative ways to combat Childhood obesity. I think The Enright communities story is very unique. How do you get children excited and involved in the gardening process?
10/18/2012 11:07:08 AM CDT