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Cooking with Cilantro

Cilantro can be an acquired taste for some, but the more you eat irresistible treats such as Black Bean and Cilantro Quesadillas, Salmon with Cilantro Pumpkin Seed Pesto and Cilantro Chutney, the more it grows on you. You’ll love it in sauces and salsas, spreads and dips, salads and dressings and as a garnish to a wide assortment of foods.

Spicy Cilantro Almond Pesto

Spicy Cilantro Almond Pesto

Cilantro is the bright green leaves of the coriander plant, the same plant that produces little seeds also called coriander. It has an unmistakable pungent fragrance and distinct flavor that lends itself to spiced foods from around the world. I learned to love it in Indian dishes I sampled in Bombay, Asian favorites in Honolulu, and TexMex recipes in Austin, Texas.

Cilantro is available year-round usually in bunches. The leaves should be green with no yellowing, browning or wilting. Store it in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 7 days. Wash well and pat dry before using. Be sure to wash only as much as you will need.

Black Bean Salad with Avocado Lime Dressing

Although cilantro can be used alongside of, or in place of parsley, and it is similar in appearance, one smell will tell you the difference! Cilantro can be an acquired taste for some, but the more you eat irresistible treats such as Black Bean and Cilantro Quesadillas, Salmon with Cilantro Pumpkin Seed Pesto and Cilantro Chutney, the more it grows on you. You’ll love it in sauces and salsas, spreads and dips, salads and dressings and as a garnish to a wide assortment of foods. Here are some ideas and recipes:

Poached Halibut with Ginger and Cilantro

Poached Halibut with Ginger and Cilantro

Do you cook with cilantro? Got a favorite recipe or a great idea? Let me know.

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