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The Obedient Onion

Whether grilled, baked, sautéed or raw, these flavorful vegetables turn a good dish into a great one! Try some of our favorite recipes featuring onions and share yours.

There are some foods in this world you either love or hate. And then there are some foods that fall into both categories. Take onions, for example. Not too long ago I had a conversation with someone about eating healthier. When I suggested sautéing onions with garlic and adding some leafy greens, they turned up their nose and said, “No way! I hate onions, unless it’s onion rings or bloomin’ with honey mustard; then I love ‘em!”While onions sometimes get a bad rap — being blamed for everything from crying to bad breath to refrigerator odors — I, for one, would not want to live in an onion-free world. Whether grilled, baked, sautéed or raw, these obedient vegetables will turn a good dish into a great dish! Not only do they complement just about any salad, soup, stew, salsa or savory dish, they are plenty versatile and are packed with flavonoids (a type of polyphenol and antioxidant) that may provide important health benefits. Remember, antioxidants are found abundantly in fruits and veggies; they help support the cells of our body by slowing down the oxidation of LDL cholesterol and preventing free radicals. Like most vegetables, onions are low in calories, fat free, cholesterol free and low in sodium.

When you shop for fresh onions, you’re bound to find a few varieties. That’s because onions are classified as either spring/summer or fall/winter. They are considered either “green” or “dry.” Green onions, such as scallions, are harvested while the shoots are young, tender and green. Dry onions can be red (or purple), white or yellow; they are harvested once their shoots have died and they’ve formed their paper-like skin. Even a shallot is a dry onion of the fall/winter variety. The spring/summer varieties of dry onions, such as Vidalia, Maui or Walla Walla, are sweeter and they don’t keep as long as other dry varieties.Fresh onions aren’t your only option. You’ll find dehydrated, powdered, granulated and mixed-dried blends that all can add depth of flavor to many dishes.Here are some favorite ways to use onions:

What’s your take on onions? Love ‘em, hate ‘em? Mixed feelings? Got a favorite recipe? Let me know!

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